MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES 

Management strategies use information provided by research and tools that can be used to make sound decisions to effectively conserve marine resources.  Baseline research about organism and community sensitivity to ocean acidification is incorporated into these strategies, in an effort to sustain these resources for the future.

Research

Before management plans can be created it is necessary to have baseline research about the effects of ocean acidification on marine resources, such as Pacific oysters, dungeness crabs and rockfish. The OAP funds NOAA Fisheries Science Centers to expose various life stages of valuable species to present and future acidification conditions. The results of this research have already been considered in management of vulnerable king crab species.  In addition, research is underway to establish baseline measures of chemistry surrounding coral reefs that can be used to evaluate the potential risk of changing ocean chemistry to these valuable ecosystems.   

Management Tools

After models are created that provide a look into the future, these models can be used to create tools for managers to use so that they can test different scenarios on species’ populations and habitats.  Modeling efforts led by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution are now being used to produce one of these tools for Atlantic sea scallop fisheries. The dashboard will allow managers to test the impacts of different management actions on scallop populations.  In the Pacific Northwest, NOAA, the University of Washington, and shellfish industry scientists have formed a strong partnership to adapt to ocean acidification impacts that have already affected the shellfish industry. Together these researchers determined that acidification was threatening oyster production and offered an approach to address it. They installed equipment to monitor carbon chemistry at shellfish hatcheries and worked with hatchery managers to develop methods that protect developing oyster larvae from exposure to low pH waters.   Early warning tools are now being used to forecast seasonal acidification conditions to enable shellfish growers to adapt their practices.

 

STORIES OF ADAPTATION

Natural Aquaculture: Can We  Save Oceans by Farming Them?

Natural Aquaculture: Can We Save Oceans by Farming Them?

Yale Environment 360

A small but growing number of entrepreneurs are creating sea-farming operations that cultivate shellfish together with kelp and seaweed, a combination they contend can restore ecosystems and mitigate the impacts of ocean acidification.

Tuesday, October 11, 2016
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