The mission of the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program (OAP) is to better prepare society to respond to changing ocean conditions and resources by expanding understanding of ocean acidification, through interdisciplinary partnerships, nationally and internationally.

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NOAA OAP established 2011

Required by the 2009 FOARAM Act (33 U.S.C. Chapter 50, Sec. 3701-3708)

NOAA OAP established 2011

NOAA OAP established 2011

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Monitoring Ocean Acidification

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Monitoring Ocean Acidification

Monitoring Ocean Acidification

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Biological Response

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Biological Response

Biological Response

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Socio-Economic Impacts

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Socio-Economic Impacts

Socio-Economic Impacts

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Adaptation Strategies

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Adaptation Strategies

Adaptation Strategies

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Education & Outreach

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Education & Outreach

Education & Outreach

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Data Collection & Management

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Data Collection & Management

Data Collection & Management

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Interagency Working Group on Ocean Acidification

Interagency Working Group on Ocean Acidification

Interagency Working Group on Ocean Acidification

Interagency Working Group on Ocean Acidification

OAP NEWS

Ocean Acidification: Building a Path Toward Adaptation in the Arctic

Ocean Acidification: Building a Path Toward Adaptation in the Arctic

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

Scientists, economists, and stakeholders from all eight Arctic countries forge a path forward in adapting to ocean acidification in the Arctic

Arctic waters are rapidly changing. In the coming decades, these high-latitude waters will undergo significant shifts that could affect fish, shellfish, marine mammals, along with the livelihoods and well-being of communities dependent on these resources.

Wednesday, February 8, 2017
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