SOARCE ARCHIVE

Live! Science at Sea: Gulf of Mexico Ocean Acidification Cruise

Live! Science at Sea: Gulf of Mexico Ocean Acidification Cruise

NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory

On July 18, NOAA AOML and partner scientists will depart on the Gulf of Mexico Ecosystems and Carbon Cycle (GOMECC-3) research cruise in support of NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Monitoring Program
Friday, July 14, 2017
Tags:
New model reveals how ocean acidification challenges tiny sea snails off U.S. West Coast

New model reveals how ocean acidification challenges tiny sea snails off U.S. West Coast

NOAA Research

A tiny sea snail, sometimes called a sea butterfly because of how it flutters about traveling the ocean currents, is part of the diet for such valuable fish as salmon and cod off the U.S West Coast.

A new study models the journey of this delicate plankton from offshore to nearshore waters, describing how changing ocean chemistry along this journey affects their condition.

Thursday, July 13, 2017
Tags:
New interactive climatology plots of aragonite saturation state and pH for public interaction

New interactive climatology plots of aragonite saturation state and pH for public interaction

NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory

The buoy team of PMEL's Carbon Group has recently developed innovative tools to better connect stakeholders to information generated by NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Observing Network.
Monday, July 3, 2017
Tags:
Acidified ocean water widespread along North American West Coast

Acidified ocean water widespread along North American West Coast

Oregon State University

A three-year survey of the California Current System along the West Coast of the United States found persistent, highly acidified water throughout this ecologically critical nearshore habitat, with 'hotspots' of pH measurements as low as any oceanic surface waters in the world.

Wednesday, May 31, 2017

Ocean Acidification – What it means and how to stop it

United Nations Development Programme

In the Sustainable Development Goals, the world has set forth a bold new vision for global development and committed to achieving it by the year 2030.   SDG 14 calls for us to “conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development.” While most of the targets in SDG 14 cover ocean issues and challenges that are well known to most, such as pollution and overfishing, one SDG 14 target, 14.3, may not be so familiar: 14.3 Minimize and address the impacts of ocean acidification, including through enhanced scientific cooperation at all levels. What is ocean acidification, and why is it so important to ocean sustainability and therefore to the SDG agenda?

Thursday, March 16, 2017
RSS
12345