Ocean Acidification means major changes for California mussels

Ocean Acidification means major changes for California mussels

Florida State University News

For thousands of years, California mussel shells have shared a relatively uniform mineralogical makeup — long, cylindrical calcite crystals ordered in neat vertical rows with crisp, geometric regularity. But in a study published this week in the journal Global Change BiologyMcCoy and her team suggest that escalating rates of ocean acidification are shaking up that shell mineralogy on its most basic structural levels. “What we’ve seen in more recent shells is that the crystals are small and disoriented,” said Assistant Professor of Biological Science Sophie McCoy, who led the study. “These are significant changes in how these animals produce their shells that can be tied to a shifting ocean chemistry.” “When the mussels are ready to build their shells, they first lay down an amorphous soup of calcium carbonate, which they later order and organize,” McCoy said. “More recent shells have just started heaping that calcium carbonate soup where it needs to go and then leaving it there disordered.” The team also found that recent shells exhibited elevated levels of magnesium — a sign that the process of shell formation has been disrupted.

Find the full article here

Photo: Sophie McCoy.

Monday, January 8, 2018
Mukilteo scientist tries to discover why C02 is hurting oceans

Mukilteo scientist tries to discover why C02 is hurting oceans

HeraldNet

Shallin Busch is a Mukilteo-based ecologist whose research is linking ocean acidification to the deteriorating health of the Puget Sound ecosystem. The Mukilteo team has looked at or is looking at ocean acidification effects on krill, salmon, Dungeness crab, black cod and pteropod (marine snails). So far it has found that lower pH levels lead to lower survival and slower development rates, as well as changes in behavior. 
Wednesday, October 11, 2017
What scientists are learning about the impact of an acidifying ocean

What scientists are learning about the impact of an acidifying ocean

OA-ICC

The effects of ocean acidification on marine life have only become widely recognized in the past decade. Now researchers are rapidly expanding the scope of investigations into what falling pH means for ocean ecosystems.

Wednesday, October 4, 2017
Coral Reef Fish Are More Resilient Than We Thought, Study Finds

Coral Reef Fish Are More Resilient Than We Thought, Study Finds

NPR

At a time when the Great Barrier Reef and other coral reefs are facing unprecedented destruction, researchers in Australia have found a small ray of hope for the fish that make the reefs their home.

Fish are more resilient to the effects of ocean acidification than scientists had previously thought, according to research published Thursday in Scientific Reports.

Tuesday, September 5, 2017
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Putting Ocean Tipping Points Science into Practice in Your Ecosystem: A Workshop for Scientists and Natural Resource Managers

Ocean Tipping Points Projects

The Ocean Tipping Points Project, an interdisciplinary research collaboration among academic, non-governmental and governmental partners, is excited to offer a unique 3-day workshop for scientists and practitioners of marine ecosystem management. Receive hands-on training in cutting-edge scientific and management strategies to better understand and cope with the potential for dramatic change in the ocean or coastal ecosystem where you work.  With generous support from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, we are offering an all-expenses paid 3-day training in Santa Barbara, CA, November 1-3, 2017.

Tuesday, August 29, 2017
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