Waterways Program Features the Impacts of Ocean Acidification on Coral Reefs

Waterways Program Features the Impacts of Ocean Acidification on Coral Reefs

NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory

The latest episode of the educational television series “Waterways” features coral research conducted by NOAA scientists in the Florida Keys. As the global ocean becomes more acidic, NOAA is documenting these changes and their impact on organisms like corals. The first part of the episode entitled “Ocean Acidification & Tortugas Tide Gauge”   features AOML researchers discussing how they study this process and the high tech tools they use to monitor and describe changes in coral growth due to a more acidic ocean.
Monday, December 1, 2014
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Ocean Acidification: NSF awards $11.4 million in new grants to study effects on marine ecosystems

Ocean Acidification: NSF awards $11.4 million in new grants to study effects on marine ecosystems

National Science Foundation

With increasing levels of carbon dioxide accumulating in the atmosphere and moving into marine ecosystems, the world's oceans are becoming more acidic.

The oceans may be acidifying faster today than at any time in the past 300 million years, scientists have found.

To address concerns for acidifying oceans, the National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded new grants totaling $11.4 million through its Ocean Acidification program. The awards are supported by NSF's Directorates for Geosciences and Biological Sciences.

Tuesday, September 9, 2014
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NOAA and partner scientists study ocean acidification in Prince William Sound

NOAA and partner scientists study ocean acidification in Prince William Sound

NOAA Research

Scientists from NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, the University of Alaska and the Alaska Ocean Observing System are teaming up this summer and early fall to use new unmanned tools to study how melting glaciers in Alaska’s Prince William Sound may be intensifying ocean acidification in the sound and on the Gulf of Alaska continental shelf. 
Tuesday, July 8, 2014
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Pacific island is natural laboratory to study ocean acidification

Pacific island is natural laboratory to study ocean acidification

NOAA Research

Ian Enochs, a scientist with NOAA’s Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies at the University of Miami, traveled in May to the Island of Maug in the Pacific Ocean as part of a NOAA expedition aboard NOAA Ship Hi’ialakai to study coral reef ecosystems. We caught up with Enochs to learn about his research on underwater vents that seep carbon dioxide into the Pacific.

Why journey to the Island of Maug to study ocean acidification?

Maug is a unique natural laboratory that allows us to study how ocean acidification affects coral reef ecosystems. We know of no other area like this in U.S. waters. Increasing carbon dioxide in seawater is a global issue because it makes it harder for animals like corals to build skeletons

Tuesday, July 1, 2014
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NOAA and partners release first federal ocean acidification strategic research plan

NOAA and partners release first federal ocean acidification strategic research plan

NOAA Research

NOAA and its partners released the first federal strategic plan to guide research and monitoring investments that will improve our understanding of ocean acidification, its potential impacts on marine species and ecosystems, and adaptation and mitigation strategies.
Wednesday, March 26, 2014
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