Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC-Oceans) ceases operation, all activities to transition to NOAA

Data management activities for the ocean component of the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC-Oceans) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have recently stopped and this letter provides information on steps being taken to minimize the impact of this stoppage on the oceanographic community. Data, numerical data packages (NDPs), data synthesis product pages, and utilities (such as CO2SYS) at CDIAC-Oceans will continue to be accessible through ORNL until September 30, 2017 when the entire CDIAC will fully cease operations.


Thursday, December 8, 2016
Categories: OA monitoring
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NOAA research links human-caused CO2 emissions to dissolving sea snail shells off U.S. West Coast

NOAA research links human-caused CO2 emissions to dissolving sea snail shells off U.S. West Coast

NOAA

For the first time, NOAA and partner scientists have connected the concentration of human-caused carbon dioxide in waters off the U.S. Pacific coast to the dissolving of shells of microscopic marine sea snails called pteropods.

“This is the first time we’ve been able to tease out the percentage of human-caused carbon dioxide from natural carbon dioxide along a large portion of the West Coast and link it directly to pteropod shell dissolution,” said Richard Feely, a NOAA senior scientist who led the research appearing in Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science. “Our research shows that humans are increasing the acidification of U.S. West Coast coastal waters, making it more difficult for marine species to build strong shells.”

Wednesday, November 23, 2016

State of the science workshop

Alaska Ocean Acidification Network

The Alaska Ocean Acidification Network is hosting a 2-day workshop in Anchorage, inviting a broad audience across the state interested in ocean acidification issues. The aim of this workshop is to educate the broader Alaska community on the processes and consequences of OA, create connections between researchers and stakeholders, and develop new ideas and partnerships to enhance monitoring and community engagement. A report on the state of the science in Alaska will be produced after the workshop, as well as a set of recommendations to help guide the Alaska OA Network.

Day 1 will be conducted in plenary format and is intended to engage a broad audience including fishermen, shellfish growers, resource managers, researchers, coastal residents and anyone interested in ocean acidification. This first day will provide the basics on OA and an overview of research, monitoring, trends, forecasts and strategies for adaptation.  Day 2 will be more discussion-oriented and include breakout groups, a session for OA researchers, and a meeting of the Alaska OA Network steering committee.

Tuesday, November 8, 2016
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Postdoctoral Opportunity: Biogeochemical Modelling

GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel

GEOMAR is looking for candidates with a strong interest in Earth system modelling and model assessment. The research project will focus on the selection of indicators and development of metrics to assess a number of climate engineering ideas (such as afforestation, ocean alkalinisation, solar radiation management,…) in the context of mitigation. Tools will be developed and tested on the basis of model simulations of various climate engineering scenarios employing new and already existing runs of intermediate complexity (UVic) and complex Earth system (MPI-ESM) models. Metric development will account for model uncertainties (e.g. by analysing perturbed parameter ensembles) and include collaboration with scientists from other disciplines engaged in the Priority Program, such as social sciences, international law and ethics, and some readiness to engage in interdisciplinary work is required.

Wednesday, November 2, 2016

Federal Funding Opportunity: Understanding Climate Impacts on Fish Stocks and Fisheries to Inform Sustainable Management

Climate Program Office

The NOAA Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR), Climate Program Office and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) Office of Science and Technology have established a partnership to advance understanding of climate-related impacts on fish or other species that support economically important fisheries. The goal is to inform sustainable fisheries management and promote resilience of the nation’s fish stocks and fisheries in a changing climate.

For FY17, this OAR/NMFS partnership, through the Coastal and Ocean Climate Applications (COCA) Program, will continue to take a regional approach to improving the resilience and adaptation of fisheries in a changing climate by soliciting proposals under two competitions. The first competition solicits proposals for projects in the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem (CCLME) and the second competition solicits proposals for projects in the Northeast Shelf Large Marine Ecosystem (NESLME). Through this announcement, it is estimated that approximately $2.2 million will be available in FY2017 for new awards pending budget appropriations. For competition I, projects can request up to $700,000 a year for three years, for a total of $2.1 million over three years. For competition II, projects can request up to $500,000 a year for three years for a total of $1.5 million over three years.

Wednesday, November 2, 2016
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