Acid trip: Great Lakes could face similar acidification risk as the seas

Acid trip: Great Lakes could face similar acidification risk as the seas

Brian Bienkowski (The Daily Climate)

As in the oceans, carbon dioxide from the atmosphere could throw off water chemistry in large freshwater bodies like the Great Lakes, putting the food web at risk. But the science remains unsettled and, according to researchers, must be bolstered if we are to understand what increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide means for freshwater.
Wednesday, December 16, 2015
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Our Deadened, Carbon-Soaked Seas

Our Deadened, Carbon-Soaked Seas

Richard W. Spinrad and Ian Boyd

Ocean and coastal waters around the world are beginning to tell a disturbing story. The seas, like a sponge, are absorbing increasing amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, so much so that the chemical balance of our oceans and coastal waters is changing and a growing threat to marine ecosystems. Over the past 200 years, the world’s seas have absorbed more than 150 billion metric tons of carbon from human activities. Currently, that’s a worldwide average of 15 pounds per person a week, enough to fill a coal train long enough to encircle the equator 13 times every year.
Thursday, October 15, 2015
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The Point of No Return: Climate Change Nightmares Are Already Here

The Point of No Return: Climate Change Nightmares Are Already Here

Rolling Stone

The impacts of ocean acidification on marine species may be occurring earlier than expected. Scientists from the NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC), Bill Peterson​, and NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL), Dr. Simone Alin and Dr. Nina Bednarsek,​ are featured in an article by The Rolling Stone discussing the imminent threat of ocean acidification on marine species in the most vulnerable regions around the globe, such as the Pacific Northwest.

Wednesday, August 5, 2015
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Waters Vast and Cold: NOAA and Partners Sail to the Gulf of Alaska to Study Ocean Acidification

Waters Vast and Cold: NOAA and Partners Sail to the Gulf of Alaska to Study Ocean Acidification

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

The waters of Alaska are vast, cold and vulnerable to the effects of ocean acidification. Although these effects have been characterized in the Bering, Chukchi and Beaufort Seas, on Monday July 13 NOAA and partners will depart to survey new waters in the Gulf of Alaska. Researchers from NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) and University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) will set sail on the NOAA ship Ronald H. Brown to survey ocean chemistry and its connections to the base of the food web in the Gulf of Alaska. 

“This cruise offers the unique opportunity for data to be collected throughout the Gulf of Alaska,” said Dr. Jessica Cross, chief scientist for this expedition, “This will be the first broad scale, comprehensive survey in this area.”

Monday, July 13, 2015
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NOAA and Partners Launch Research Cruise of East Coast to Study Ocean Acidification

NOAA and Partners Launch Research Cruise of East Coast to Study Ocean Acidification

By: NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

NOAA and scientists from PrincetonOld Dominion University, and the Universities of New HampshireDelaware, and Miami set off on June 19th from Newport, Rhode Island aboard NOAA ship Gordon Gunter on a research cruise to better understand ocean acidification and its drivers along the U.S. East Coast. 

This research cruise is just one part of a larger effort supported by the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program to better understand how ocean chemistry along all the U.S. coasts is changing in response to ocean acidification and where marine organisms may be at greatest risk. Similar cruises have taken place on the U.S. West Coast and the Gulf of Mexico. Understanding why and how fast our ocean chemistry is changing in different areas will allow scientists to better predict future changes and explore ways to adapt to those shifts.

Monday, June 22, 2015
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