Scientists warn ocean food supply may be impacted by rising CO2

Scientists warn ocean food supply may be impacted by rising CO2

NBC News

Marine biologists are searching for evidence of what our oceans will look like if carbon dioxide levels continue to increase. Thirty percent of the carbon dioxide, or CO2, released into the atmosphere is absorbed by the ocean, leading to a process called acidification. Shellfish and coral reefs are particularly impacted, according to Jason Hall-Spencer of Plymouth University. “We’ve never put this much carbon dioxide into the ocean before,” he said. “It’s never happened before in Earth’s history. Not this quickly.” NBC’s Ann Curry reports.
Sunday, April 6, 2014
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Sea Change: Food for Millions at Risk

Sea Change: Food for Millions at Risk

The Seattle Times

A remote Indonesian village highlights the threats facing millions of people who depend on marine creatures susceptible to souring seas and ocean warming.

Wednesday, January 15, 2014
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Arctic Ocean Acidification

Arctic Ocean Acidification

Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme

The report by the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program on Arctic Ocean Acidification was recently released and identifies the risks to Arctic ecosystems, including indigenous tribes and Arctic residents.

Sunday, December 1, 2013
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How shifting ocean chemistry threatens Maine

How shifting ocean chemistry threatens Maine

Bangor Daily News

An environmental crisis is looming on the marine horizon. Ocean acidification threatens Maine’s inshore fisheries, growing aquaculture industry and the jobs that rely on them.

The culprit in this story is carbon dioxide. It’s changing the chemistry of the ocean and endangering shellfish like lobster, oysters, clams and sea urchins.

Monday, October 28, 2013
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Acidification of oceans threatens to change entire marine ecosystem

Acidification of oceans threatens to change entire marine ecosystem

Vancouver Sun

Ocean acidification due to excessive release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere is threatening to produce large-scale changes to the marine ecosystem affecting all levels of the food chain, a University of B.C. marine biologist warned Friday.

Chris Harley, associate professor in the department of zoology, warned that ocean acidification also carries serious financial implications by making it more difficult for species such as oysters, clams, and sea urchins to build shells and skeletons from calcium carbonate. Acidic water is expected to result in thinner, slower-growing shells, and reduced abundance. Larvae can be especially vulnerable to acidity.

Friday, October 25, 2013
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