Turning the High Beams on Ocean Acidification: NOAA Funds Shellfish Farmers and Scientist To Expand Pacific Coast Monitoring With $1.4 Million Over Three Years

Turning the High Beams on Ocean Acidification: NOAA Funds Shellfish Farmers and Scientist To Expand Pacific Coast Monitoring With $1.4 Million Over Three Years

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

NOAA is providing a grant of $1.4 million over three years to help shellfish growers and scientific experts work together to expand ocean acidification (OA) monitoring in waters that are particularly important to Pacific coast communities such as in oyster hatcheries and coastal waters where young oysters are grown. 

Shellfish growers, hatchery owners and scientists will work together to strengthen their understanding of and ability to adapt to the impacts of ocean acidification on the Pacific Coast of the US, including Alaska. Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the burning of fossil fuels, which are being absorbed by the ocean, are causing a change in ocean chemistry which has already been detected along this coast. 

Monday, December 15, 2014
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Ocean Acidification Concerns, Information to be aired at Northeast Stakeholders Workshop

Ocean Acidification Concerns, Information to be aired at Northeast Stakeholders Workshop

The Northeast Coastal Acidification Network (NECAN) is hosting an “Ocean and Coastal Acidification Stakeholder Workshop” on December 10, 2014 at the Darling Marine Center in Walpole, Maine. The purpose is to inform and learn from fishermen, clam harvesters, aquaculturists, and coastal water quality volunteer programs their concerns and state of knowledge about ocean and coastal acidification (OCA). 

Thursday, December 4, 2014
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Waterways Program Features the Impacts of Ocean Acidification on Coral Reefs

Waterways Program Features the Impacts of Ocean Acidification on Coral Reefs

NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory

The latest episode of the educational television series “Waterways” features coral research conducted by NOAA scientists in the Florida Keys. As the global ocean becomes more acidic, NOAA is documenting these changes and their impact on organisms like corals. The first part of the episode entitled “Ocean Acidification & Tortugas Tide Gauge”   features AOML researchers discussing how they study this process and the high tech tools they use to monitor and describe changes in coral growth due to a more acidic ocean.
Monday, December 1, 2014
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Ocean Acidification: NSF awards $11.4 million in new grants to study effects on marine ecosystems

Ocean Acidification: NSF awards $11.4 million in new grants to study effects on marine ecosystems

National Science Foundation

With increasing levels of carbon dioxide accumulating in the atmosphere and moving into marine ecosystems, the world's oceans are becoming more acidic.

The oceans may be acidifying faster today than at any time in the past 300 million years, scientists have found.

To address concerns for acidifying oceans, the National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded new grants totaling $11.4 million through its Ocean Acidification program. The awards are supported by NSF's Directorates for Geosciences and Biological Sciences.

Tuesday, September 9, 2014
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NOAA and partner scientists study ocean acidification in Prince William Sound

NOAA and partner scientists study ocean acidification in Prince William Sound

NOAA Research

Scientists from NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, the University of Alaska and the Alaska Ocean Observing System are teaming up this summer and early fall to use new unmanned tools to study how melting glaciers in Alaska’s Prince William Sound may be intensifying ocean acidification in the sound and on the Gulf of Alaska continental shelf. 
Tuesday, July 8, 2014
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