Ocean Acidification: NSF awards $11.4 million in new grants to study effects on marine ecosystems

Ocean Acidification: NSF awards $11.4 million in new grants to study effects on marine ecosystems

National Science Foundation

With increasing levels of carbon dioxide accumulating in the atmosphere and moving into marine ecosystems, the world's oceans are becoming more acidic.

The oceans may be acidifying faster today than at any time in the past 300 million years, scientists have found.

To address concerns for acidifying oceans, the National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded new grants totaling $11.4 million through its Ocean Acidification program. The awards are supported by NSF's Directorates for Geosciences and Biological Sciences.

Tuesday, September 9, 2014
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Innovative Lab Gauges Acidification Effects on Marine Snails

Innovative Lab Gauges Acidification Effects on Marine Snails

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

Carbon dioxide scrubbers like those that clean the air in space stations. Precision monitors and instruments. Industrial parts used in wastewater treatment.

Michael Maher’s job was to assemble the pieces into one of the most sophisticated ocean acidification simulation systems yet developed. Ocean acidification is the decrease in ocean pH due to its absorption of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere – carbon dioxide forms an acid when it dissolves in water.

Monday, September 8, 2014
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WHOI Scientists Receive $1 Million Grant from MacArthur Foundation

WHOI Scientists Receive $1 Million Grant from MacArthur Foundation

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Rapid climate change and an increasing range of climate impacts are already being felt along our coasts, and new research suggests that U.S. Northeast coastal waters may be more vulnerable to climate change and ocean acidification than previously thought.
Tuesday, September 2, 2014
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A wake-up call in Alaska about ocean acidification and coastal communities

A wake-up call in Alaska about ocean acidification and coastal communities

Jeremy Mathis & Steve Colt

A new study shows, for the first time, that ocean acidification is driving changes in waters vital to Alaska’s commercial fisheries and traditional subsistence way of life.

As one of our planet’s most under-recognized challenges, ocean acidification is emerging because the sea is absorbing increasing amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. CO2 concentrations are now higher than at any time during the past 800,000 years, and the current rate of increase is likely unprecedented in history. Ocean acidification is literally causing a sea change, threatening the fundamental health of ocean and coastal waters from pole to pole. And, as the new study indicates, the implications for Alaska may be profound.

Tuesday, July 29, 2014
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Increased Ocean Acidity Puts Alaska Fisheries At Risk, Study Says

Increased Ocean Acidity Puts Alaska Fisheries At Risk, Study Says

Becky Bohrer (Associated Press)

JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — The release of carbon dioxide into the air from power plant smokestacks to the tailpipe on your car could pose a risk to red king crab and other lucrative fisheries in Alaska, a new report says.

Ocean water becomes more acidic when it absorbs carbon dioxide released by human sources, such as the burning of fossil fuels. Increased ocean acidification could harm important Alaska commercial and subsistence fisheries and communities that rely heavily on them, according to the new research aimed at spurring discussion on how to address the changes.

Tuesday, July 29, 2014
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