SCIENTISTS GATHER FROM AROUND THE WORLD TO DEVELOP A GLOBAL OCEAN ACIDIFICATION OBSERVING NETWORK

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

NOAA, academic and international scientific experts are gathering July 24 -26, to further develop the Global Ocean Acidification Network (GOA-ON). The purpose of this network is to facilitate international coordination in order to compare and integrate observational data collection specific to ocean acidification across the globe. This group is designing a global standard for measuring and identifying ocean acidification and is important for establishing a global understanding of ocean acidification including its impacts on ocean life as well as humans. This network will ensure data quality and comparability, facilitated by a structured system based on common standards. It will also assist policy-making through research products and model-based projections of future potential impacts of ocean acidification. 

Wednesday, July 24, 2013
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Scientists Gather from Around the World to Develop a Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network

Scientists Gather from Around the World to Develop a Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

NOAA, academic and international scientific experts are gathering July 24 -26, to further develop the Global Ocean Acidification Network (GOA-ON).  The purpose of this network is to facilitate international coordination in order to compare and integrate observational data collection specific to ocean acidification across the globe.  This group is designing a global standard for measuring and identifying ocean acidification and is important for establishing a global understanding of ocean acidification including its impacts on ocean life as well as humans. This network will ensure data quality and comparability, facilitated by a structured system based on common standards.   It will also assist policy-making through research products and model-based projections of future potential impacts of ocean acidification. 

Wednesday, July 24, 2013
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Alaska Ocean Acidification Network Nears Completion

Alaska Ocean Acidification Network Nears Completion

Scientists at Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) and the Ocean Acidification Center at University of Alaska Fairbanks maintain four buoys in the Gulf of Alaska and Bering Sea that comprise a network to monitor ocean chemistry in sub-arctic waters.  These high latitude waters are of much interest and concern because cold waters more readily absorb CO2, which causes a decrease pH and saturation state.  Additionally, the  predicted reduction of sea ice in this region can increase the uptake of CO2 due to 1) increased freshwater input from melt-water and rivers 2) more seawater being exposed to the atmosphere to absorb COand 3) alteration of the production and decomposition of organic carbon due to increased surface area of ocean water.  

Friday, April 12, 2013
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Pacific Northwest paying high price for carbon emissions

The Grist

It is ironic that despite relatively progressive clean energy policies the West Coast is paying an unusually high price for global carbon emissions. Ocean water off the Pacific coast has absorbed so much carbon that it is becoming acidic enough to melt the shells of sea creatures. Our national and global addiction to fossil fuel and unwillingness to seriously reduce carbon emissions is taking its toll, right here, in real time, with profound implications for the Pacific Ocean.

Friday, February 1, 2013
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EPA Identifies Ocean Acidity as Climate Change Indicator

EPA Identifies Ocean Acidity as Climate Change Indicator

The ocean plays an important role in regulating the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. As atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide rise (see the Atmospheric Concentrations of Greenhouse Gases indicator on p. 16), the ocean absorbs more carbon dioxide. Because of the slow mixing time between surface waters and deeper waters, it can take hundreds to thousands of years to establish this balance. Over the past 250 years, oceans have absorbed approximately 40 percent of the carbon dioxide produced by human activities.

Wednesday, December 12, 2012
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