The spirit of collaboration aboard Gulf of Mexico cruise

The spirit of collaboration aboard Gulf of Mexico cruise

NOAA Research &Ocean Acidification Program

This summer, NOAA and partner scientists will conduct their most collaborative ocean acidification sampling of the Gulf of Mexico yet. Set to depart today, July 18th, the Gulf of Mexico Ecosystems and Carbon Cruise (GOMECC-3) will travel through international waters with 24 scientists from the United States, Mexico and Cuba on board.
Tuesday, July 18, 2017
Live! Science at Sea: Gulf of Mexico Ocean Acidification Cruise

Live! Science at Sea: Gulf of Mexico Ocean Acidification Cruise

NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory

On July 18, NOAA AOML and partner scientists will depart on the Gulf of Mexico Ecosystems and Carbon Cycle (GOMECC-3) research cruise in support of NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Monitoring Program
Friday, July 14, 2017
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New interactive climatology plots of aragonite saturation state and pH for public interaction

New interactive climatology plots of aragonite saturation state and pH for public interaction

NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory

The buoy team of PMEL's Carbon Group has recently developed innovative tools to better connect stakeholders to information generated by NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Observing Network.
Monday, July 3, 2017
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Acidified ocean water widespread along North American West Coast

Acidified ocean water widespread along North American West Coast

Oregon State University

A three-year survey of the California Current System along the West Coast of the United States found persistent, highly acidified water throughout this ecologically critical nearshore habitat, with 'hotspots' of pH measurements as low as any oceanic surface waters in the world.

Wednesday, May 31, 2017
Research shows ocean acidification is spreading rapidly in the Arctic

Research shows ocean acidification is spreading rapidly in the Arctic

NOAA Oceanic and Atmospheric Research

Ocean acidification is spreading rapidly in the western Arctic Ocean in both area and depth, potentially affecting shellfish, other marine species in the food web, and communities that depend on these resources, according to new research published in Nature Climate Change by NOAA, Chinese marine scientists and other partners.

Tuesday, March 14, 2017
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