Coral Reef Fish Are More Resilient Than We Thought, Study Finds

Coral Reef Fish Are More Resilient Than We Thought, Study Finds

NPR

At a time when the Great Barrier Reef and other coral reefs are facing unprecedented destruction, researchers in Australia have found a small ray of hope for the fish that make the reefs their home.

Fish are more resilient to the effects of ocean acidification than scientists had previously thought, according to research published Thursday in Scientific Reports.

Tuesday, September 5, 2017
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Keeping An Eye On Ocean Acidification In Chesapeake Bay

Keeping An Eye On Ocean Acidification In Chesapeake Bay

University of Delaware

 

New paper identifies pH minimum zone in bay water.

A research team, led by University of Delaware professor Wei-Jun Cai, has identified a zone of water that is increasing in acidity in the Chesapeake Bay.

The team analyzed little studied factors that play a role in ocean acidification (OA) — changes in water chemistry that threaten the ability of shellfish such as oysters, clams and scallops to create and maintain their shells, among other impacts.

 

Friday, September 1, 2017
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The spirit of collaboration aboard Gulf of Mexico cruise

The spirit of collaboration aboard Gulf of Mexico cruise

NOAA Research &Ocean Acidification Program

This summer, NOAA and partner scientists will conduct their most collaborative ocean acidification sampling of the Gulf of Mexico yet. Set to depart today, July 18th, the Gulf of Mexico Ecosystems and Carbon Cruise (GOMECC-3) will travel through international waters with 24 scientists from the United States, Mexico and Cuba on board.
Tuesday, July 18, 2017
Live! Science at Sea: Gulf of Mexico Ocean Acidification Cruise

Live! Science at Sea: Gulf of Mexico Ocean Acidification Cruise

NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory

On July 18, NOAA AOML and partner scientists will depart on the Gulf of Mexico Ecosystems and Carbon Cycle (GOMECC-3) research cruise in support of NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Monitoring Program
Friday, July 14, 2017
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New model reveals how ocean acidification challenges tiny sea snails off U.S. West Coast

New model reveals how ocean acidification challenges tiny sea snails off U.S. West Coast

NOAA Research

A tiny sea snail, sometimes called a sea butterfly because of how it flutters about traveling the ocean currents, is part of the diet for such valuable fish as salmon and cod off the U.S West Coast.

A new study models the journey of this delicate plankton from offshore to nearshore waters, describing how changing ocean chemistry along this journey affects their condition.

Thursday, July 13, 2017
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