Latest Science Updates to the 2012 WA State Blue Ribbon Panel Report

Latest Science Updates to the 2012 WA State Blue Ribbon Panel Report

Marine Resources Advisory Council

The Washington state governor’s appointed board, the Marine Resources Advisory Council, released its first update in five years to the state’s coordinated response to ocean acidification. In the five years since the Blue Ribbon Panel’s report, there have been significant scientific advances and progress made on the 42 recommended actions. The report highlights the new research that justifies more concerted efforts to combat ocean acidification. The report is publicly available here

Eleven NOAA and Washington Sea Grant scientists from the National Ocean Service, National Marine Fisheries Service and the Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research served on the Blue Ribbon “Refresh” Panel and contributed to the report.

Photo Credit: NW Straits Commission

Wednesday, December 20, 2017
New Video on Ocean Acidification: Salmon and the Puget Sound

New Video on Ocean Acidification: Salmon and the Puget Sound

Tiffany Grunzel, University of Washington Communications Leadership Program

Ocean acidification could have deep impacts for salmon in the Puget Sound. 

Tiffany Grunzel from the University of Washington Communications Leadership program, interviews Dr. Shallin Busch (NOAA), Dr. Chase Williams (UW), and Robert Purser Jr. (Susquamish Fisheries) about the direct and indirect impacts of ocean acidification on salmon and what this could mean for tribal culture and the seafood industry.

A link to the video can be found here

Saturday, December 16, 2017
Categories: OA News
Oysters on acid: How the ocean's declining pH will change the way we eat

Oysters on acid: How the ocean's declining pH will change the way we eat

The New Food Economy

The ocean is changing faster than it has in the last 66 million years. Now, Oregon oysters are being farmed in Hawaii. That fix won’t work forever. 

A little more than ten years ago, a mysterious epidemic wiped out baby oyster populations. After two years of massive losses and no answers, scientists testing the waters discovered what was really wrong: the ocean water flowing into the hatcheries had changed, and the oysters weren’t able to build their shells. 

Check out the full article by H. Claire Brown, The New Food Economy, 28 November 2017.

Saturday, December 2, 2017
Mukilteo scientist tries to discover why C02 is hurting oceans

Mukilteo scientist tries to discover why C02 is hurting oceans

HeraldNet

Shallin Busch is a Mukilteo-based ecologist whose research is linking ocean acidification to the deteriorating health of the Puget Sound ecosystem. The Mukilteo team has looked at or is looking at ocean acidification effects on krill, salmon, Dungeness crab, black cod and pteropod (marine snails). So far it has found that lower pH levels lead to lower survival and slower development rates, as well as changes in behavior. 
Wednesday, October 11, 2017
Study predicts decline in Dungeness crab from ocean acidification

Study predicts decline in Dungeness crab from ocean acidification

The Seattle Times

Dungeness crab are forecast to take a hit from ocean acidification driven by fossil- fuel combustion, according to a study released this past week. Though the populations of the Dungeness crab fluctuate year by year, their overall abundance by 2063 could be about 30 percent lower, according to federal fishery biologist Issac Kaplan, a co-author of the study, “We think that there will be a moderate decline in a species that is really economically important,” said Kaplan of the Dungeness, which were valued at some $220 million during the 2013 West Coast commercial season. Read more

Wednesday, January 18, 2017
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