Federal Funding Opportunity: Regional Vulnerability Assessments for Ocean Acidification

Ocean Acidification Program

The Ocean Acidification Program is soliciting proposals for collaborative projects of up to 2 years in duration that synthesize ocean acidification information at a regional scale (e.g. Large Marine Ecosystem, large estuary or collection of small estuaries, and state or collection of states in US waters) to determine where societal vulnerabilities to ocean acidification exist or are emerging, in order to provide actionable information for marine resource decision makers. This funding opportunity will not support the collection of new chemical or ecological observations or species response data. Social science data collection is permitted. For more information visit the Opportunities page.  

Wednesday, September 7, 2016
NOAA and Sea Grant fund $800,000 in research to understand effects of ocean changes on iconic Northeast marine life

NOAA and Sea Grant fund $800,000 in research to understand effects of ocean changes on iconic Northeast marine life

NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Program (OAP) and the Northeast Sea Grant Programs joined together to prioritize and fund new research on how ocean acidification is affecting marine life including lobsters, clams, oysters, mussels and sand lance that are so important to the Northeast region. Funding includes $800,000 in federal funds from the two programs with an additional $400,000 non-federal match.
Tuesday, September 6, 2016
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New tool helps oyster growers prepare for changing ocean chemistry

NOAA Research

For Bill Mook, coastal acidification is one thing his oyster hatchery cannot afford to ignore.

Mook Sea Farm depends on seawater from the Gulf of Maine pumped into a Quonset hut-style building where tiny oysters are grown in tanks. Mook sells these tiny oysters to other oyster farmers or transfers them to his oyster farm on the Damariscotta River where they grow large enough to sell to restaurants and markets on the East Coast.

Tuesday, September 6, 2016
BENEATH THE WAVES, CLIMATE CHANGE PUTS MARINE LIFE ON THE MOVE

BENEATH THE WAVES, CLIMATE CHANGE PUTS MARINE LIFE ON THE MOVE

The Connecticut Mirror

The Connecticut Mirror details the changes in marine species distributions in New England and what this could mean for the future of fisheries in the region.

Monday, September 5, 2016
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Surfing for science: Researchers are using Smartfin to study ocean

Today Show

Neurologist Andy Stern says some marine biologists are predicting a possibly grim future for the ocean, but he and his team of engineers developed an inexpensive and portable product to study the waters. It’s an intelligent surfboard, called Smartfin, which analyzes different details of the waves, to hopefully one day provide insight into what climate change is doing now and what it will do next.

Friday, September 2, 2016
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