NOAA Scientists Look at Potential Ocean Acidification Impacts on the Puget Sound Food Web

NOAA Scientists Look at Potential Ocean Acidification Impacts on the Puget Sound Food Web

NOAA scientists at the Northwest Fisheries Science Center are beginning to understand future impacts of ocean acidification on Puget Sound’s food web. Drs. Shallin Busch, Chris Harvey, and Paul McElhany applied ocean acidification scenarios to a food web model to explore how the estuary’s food web and its ecosystem services (i.e. fisheries yield and ecotourism) may change over the next fifty years

Friday, July 19, 2013
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NOAA Led Study Shows Walleye Pollock Resilience to Ocean Acidification

NOAA Led Study Shows Walleye Pollock Resilience to Ocean Acidification

Scientists at NOAA’s Alaska Fisheries Science Center recently found that some life history parameters of walleye pollock seem to be only minimally affected by high CO2 waters. Dr. Thomas Hurst and University of Alaska colleagues Elena Fernandez and Dr. Jeremy Mathis conducted multiple experiments in conditions mimicking both present day CO2 levels in high latitude waters and those predicted to occur over the next century (280-2100µatm, pH= 7.4- 8.16).

 

Friday, July 12, 2013
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NOAA’s own Dr. Libby Jewett talks Ocean Acidification at the UN

NOAA’s own Dr. Libby Jewett talks Ocean Acidification at the UN

On June 18th, 2013, Dr. Libby Jewett, director of the NOAA Ocean Acidification program spoke as one of the panelists at the fourteenth meeting of the UN Open-ended Informal Consultative Process on Oceans and the Law of the Sea.  This year’s topic focused on the impact of ocean acidification on the marine environment.
Wednesday, June 19, 2013
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Shellfish industry pins hope on Freeport research

Bangor Daily News

Following a recent Town Council appropriation, the town’s shellfish community has started what is being called a “historic” effort to address the rapid disappearance of soft-shell clams.

The effort is the first comprehensive, large-scale research project in Maine to study the most significant factors believed to be contributing to the decline of shellfish resources, said Brian Beal, a professor at the University of Maine at Machias and one of the scientists working on the project.

“To the best of my knowledge, I am not aware of any community that has raised this much money for a shellfish research project, ever,” he said. “(It) underscores the commitment by the town to this very important commercial resource that they co-manage with the state of Maine.”

Tuesday, May 21, 2013
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Study shows oyster reefs buffer acidification of Chesapeake Bay

Study shows oyster reefs buffer acidification of Chesapeake Bay

Virginia Institute of Marine Science

A new study co-authored by Prof. Roger Mann of 's Virginia Institute of Marine Science adds a new item to the list of oyster reef benefits — the ability to buffer increasing acidity of ocean waters.

Concerns about increasing acidity in Chesapeake Bay and the global ocean stem from human inputs of carbon dioxide to seawater, either through burning of fossil fuels or runoff of excess nutrients from land. The latter over-fertilizes marine plants and ultimately leads to increased respiration by plankton-filtering oysters and bacteria. In either case, adding carbon dioxide to water produces carbonic acid, a process that has increased ocean acidity by more than 30 percent since the start of the Industrial Revolution.

Wednesday, May 8, 2013
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