SOARCE ARCHIVE

Next-Gen gene sequencing to understand effects of ocean acidification on Alaskan crab and fish

Chris Long - NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center

Using next-generation sequencing techniques to assess adaptive capacity and illuminate mechanisms underlying the effects of high pCO2 on Alaskan crab and fish species

Why we care
Many economically important crab and fish species are negatively affected by exposure to ocean acidification predicted to occur throughout their ranges in the coming decades. Ocean acidification results in decreased growth, altered development, weaker exoskeletons, increased energy outputs, altered immune systems, altered behavior, and increased mortality in some of these species. Other stressors such as increased temperature can have interactive negative effects when combined with ocean acidification. Traditional laboratory experiments cannot duplicate the gradual changes that will affect species populations over multiple life-history stages and generations, so using next-generation genetic approaches provide insight into effects beyond specific life stages.

What we are doing 
This study will use next-generation sequencing techniques to identify specific alterations in the molecular, metabolic, and physiological pathways of individuals exposed to ocean acidification. This is a way to identify pathways that impart tolerance to ocean acidification and warming. This project determines the effect of ocean acidification and thermal stress on gene expression in Pacific cod larvae and juvenile Tanner crab and identifies genetic markers indicating ocean acidification resilience. 

Benefits of our work
Investigators will identify the cellular pathways that impart tolerance to ocean acidification. By comparing individuals that demonstrate low sensitivity to ocean acidification and with the general population, we enhance the ability to predict how adaptation will alter the species’ response to future ocean conditions. This research will inform the fishing industry and coastal, fisheries-dependent Alaskan communities about potential effects of ocean change on commercially important species. Outcomes can be used to drive future responses and adaptations in these industries regarding affected fisheries.

Thursday, May 26, 2022

Funding Opportunity: Interagency Working Group on Research for Farming Seaweeds and Seagrasses

External Funding Opportunity Due June 1, 2022

The Bigelow Center for Seafood Solutions is excited to announce the request for applications for funding to support pilot studies relevant to the Interagency Working Group on Research for Farming of Seaweeds and Seagrasses, chaired by the USDA’s Agricultural Research Service and operating in partnership with the Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences' Center for Seafood Solutions.

Three $100,000 awards will be granted to academic institutions or research nonprofits leading new research endeavors aimed to (1) deacidify ocean environments, (2) produce feedstock for agriculture applications, OR (3) develop other scalable applications for seaweed, seagrasses, or products derived from them.

To apply, go to the application login page below and click "CREATE NEW ACCOUNT" to set up a new account:

https://www.grantinterface.com/Home/Logon?urlkey=bigelow

All applicant eligibility and application requirements can be found on the application homepage.

Submission Deadline: June 1, 2022 5PM EDT

Applications will be reviewed by an academic panel and awards made this August. 
Monday, April 25, 2022
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Ocean acidification featured at 2022 Ocean Sciences Meeting

The 2022 Ocean Sciences Meeting held virtually February 24 - March 4 will feature more than 30 ocean and coastal acidification presentations by researchers supported by NOAA Ocean Acidification Program. Read more about their presentations, which include talks, posters, a town hall meeting and tutorial about Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) and ocean acidification research. The Ocean Sciences Meeting, the global leader of ocean sciences conferences, is co-sponsored by the American Geophysical Union (AGU), the Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO), and The Oceanography Society (TOS). 

Monday, February 28, 2022

Postdoctural Opportunity: Responses of farmed shellfish to mutiple stressors

Rutgers University

The Haskin Shellifsh Research Lab at Rutgers University is seeking a postdoctoral research associate to join a dynamic research team on a project that will involve both field-based and laboratory-based experiments.The postdoc will be responsible for coordinating experiments which will include farm-scale grow-out experiments in the ocean, lab-scale multi-stressor (temperature and ocean acidification) experiments in the hatchery, meetings with industry and management collaborators, and writing reports and manuscripts about results. Opportunities for grant writing, undergraduate student mentoring, and presentations at science conferences will be encouraged. Funding is in place for 18 monthsand will include travel to meet with project collaborators and advisors from management and fishing communities.

Find more information and apply here.

Wednesday, November 3, 2021
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The Northeast Coastal Acidification Network: A Force for Ocean Acidification Coordination

NOAA OCEAN ACIDIFICATION PROGRAM

“We need to do this in the Northeast!”

Dwight Gledhill, Deputy Director of NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Program, and Ru Morrison, Executive Director of Northeastern Regional Association of Coastal Ocean Observing Systems (NERACOOS), exclaimed after listening to a presentation on the newly formed California Current Acidification Network. Seeing how the West Coast was creating a collaboration of scientists, industry members, and managers on the West Coast inspired them to start a similar effort on the other side of the country in the Northeast US.

Thursday, August 26, 2021
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