SOARCE ARCHIVE

Thursday, January 30, 12-1pm EST

New Insights into the Complexity of Estuarine Acidification Seminar

This virtual seminar will focus coupled a comprehensive measurement program to retrospective and future model simulations to quantify controls on estuarine acidification in Chesapeake Bay,a large estuarine complex with strong gradients of salinity, oxygen, metabolicrates, and bathymetry. Researched found that estuarine acidification may be even more complex (and interesting!) than originally posited, owing to self-buffering processes within macrophyte communities, connections of acidification rates to watershed management aimed at oxygen improvements, and a varying buffering of acidification through altered carbonate chemistry within freshwater sources. This new understanding presents both challenges and opportunities to managing future acidification along the coast.

 Please register at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/testa/event/registration.html

Thursday, January 23, 2020
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Ocean Acidification: Building on a Foundation at the Flower Garden Banks Sanctuary

Ocean Acidification: Building on a Foundation at the Flower Garden Banks Sanctuary

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

Looking up at high-rise buildings, towering cathedrals, or the great pyramids at Giza; the feats of man seem unimaginable. The key to these massive architectural achievements is laying a quality foundation. Dr. Xinping Hu, an associate professor at Texas A&M Corpus Christi University, knows that a solid foundation is very important in science as well. Together with his co-investigators at NOAA’s Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Lab (AOML), Texas A&M University, and Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, Dr. Hu will be building upon a foundation of data collected both at and near the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary (NMS) in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico to better characterize the changes in ocean chemistry over space and time in these waters.

There are many facets to a strong structure, architectural or scientific. Having the right tools and site to build, along with a skilled team of craftsmen, and an insightful foreman are all integral to conduct impactful science.


Thursday, November 7, 2019
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Strengthening the net: Ocean acidification observations in California

Strengthening the net: Ocean acidification observations in California

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

A foggy morning on the central California coastline is a picturesque scene of rolling waves, screeching gulls, and fishermen hauling hefty nets teeming with fish. If you look closely at the net you observe that it is a framework of lines working together to capture a greater amount of fish than a single fishing line could capture alone. In the same way, ocean observing systems can be thought of as a net to capture what is happening with our ocean’s chemistry. But a net with gaps or holes is not very efficient, whether it be in fishing or in observing. A newly funded project by Dr. Chris Edwards, a Professor at the University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC), along with collaborators at UCSC and the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) is taking a look at where ‘holes’ in our observing system are. The team will identify ways to fill those gaps in order to capture changing ocean chemistry along the California coast.
Tuesday, October 8, 2019
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Optimizing Acidification Observations In A Changing Ocean

Optimizing Acidification Observations In A Changing Ocean

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

There are hundreds if not thousands of eyes on our changing ocean at any moment: Buoys, gliders, saildrones and ships measure carbonate chemistry and new ocean observing technologies are continually being created to monitor ocean acidification. As science and technology progress it is important to ensure that the most up to date knowledge is applied to the task at hand. NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Program (OAP) is teaming up with the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS®) to fund four projects aimed at improving the observing system design for characterizing ocean acidification. This work will evaluate the capability of existing observations to characterize the magnitude and extent of acidification and explore alternative regional ocean acidification observing approaches. Ultimately this work will minimize errors in measurements, better integrate existing observations, and minimize costs of monitoring ocean acidification.

Learn more about this exciting work here!

Tuesday, September 10, 2019
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Collaborating with community science groups for coastal acidification monitoring

Collaborating with community science groups for coastal acidification monitoring

Wednesday, June 26th, 2019 2pm ET (11am PT)

In this webinar, Beth Turner of NOAA National Ocean Service, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, shares priorities and capacities of citizen science groups for acidification measurements in the Northeast US, reactions to the provided training, lessons gained and how we might engage in future coordinated monitoring efforts.

Monday, June 10, 2019
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