SOARCE ARCHIVE

Join us for the Ocean Acidification Community Meeting Jan 4-6, 2023

Join us for the Ocean Acidification Community Meeting Jan 4-6, 2023

NOAA OAP convenes community meeting in San Diego, CA!

Every three years, the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program convenes researchers, communicators and others in the OA community for a meeting to discuss and share the latest research and future needs and directions. We want your participation! Registration is free.

Meeting Goals

  • Shape the future strategic direction of the OAP

  • Inform community members of recent OAP-supported efforts

  • Foster collaborations within the OA research community

  • Identify critical research gaps and efforts to address them

  • Highlight and discuss diversity, equity, inclusion, accessibility, and justice in OA research and our community

Find more details and register HERE.

Wednesday, September 28, 2022
Modeling the impact of OA on Alaskan fisheries for decision makers

Modeling the impact of OA on Alaskan fisheries for decision makers

Michael Dalton - Alaska Fisheries Science Center

Forecast effects of ocean acidification on Alaska crab and groundfish fisheries

Why we care
Ocean acidification (OA) is a multi-disciplinary problem that requires a combination of methods from oceanography, fisheries science, and social science to assess socio-economic impacts. While OA impact models developed to date capture some sources of measurement uncertainty, more remains and limits the utility of models in decision making and research planning. A method is needed to quantify uncertainty relating the experimental design of OA experiments to the impacts of ocean pH and temperature on key model outcomes.

What we are doing
The bioeconomic model developed under this project will be applied to forecasting long-term effects of OA on Eastern Bering Sea (EBS) crab, northern rock sole and Alaska cod. Also addressed in this project is the quantification of uncertainty for inclusion in the fisheries management process. The overall goal for this project is to forecast long-term effects of OA on abundance yields and fishery income. To this end, we will apply results from experiments and ocean monitoring/modeling to infer population-scale changes in juvenile growth and survival from OA.

Benefits of our work
Through development of bioeconomic models for the EBS and Gulf of Alaska, we will be able to forecast the long-term effects of OA on northern rock sole and Alaska cod – a fish providing the vast majority of U.S. cod. These models make it possible to estimate abundance yields, fishery income, and economic impacts of OA on a national scale. The results from the project can assist with the development of experiments that will be most informative for bioeconomic modeling.


Wednesday, August 31, 2022

Assessing risks of ocean acidification in south-central and southeast Alaska

Tom Hurst - NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center

Evaluating ocean acidification vulnerability and interactions among traditional and coastal Alaska industries

Why we care
Many marine species affected by ocean acidification (OA) contribute to Alaska’s highly productive commercial fisheries and traditional subsistence ways of life. Concern exists that acidification will cause ecosystem-level shifts, diminishing the overall economic value of commercial fisheries and reducing food security for communities relying on subsistence harvests. 

What we are doing
This project addresses acidification threats in south-central and southeast Alaska. It involves the development of decision support tools incorporating acidification risks into localized socio-ecological systems. The tools are based on a network of models representing acidification hazards, bio-ecological systems, and socioeconomic systems linked to adaptive actions.

Benefits of our work
This project is an exchange of knowledge between scientists, policy makers, and community stakeholders. The network of models creates decision support tools responsive to stakeholder concerns that reflect regional variation in community priorities and their ecological social and management context. The project synthesizes the best available science to determine the risks posed by ocean acidification.

Thursday, June 23, 2022

The Northeast Coastal Acidification Network: A Force for Ocean Acidification Coordination

NOAA OCEAN ACIDIFICATION PROGRAM

“We need to do this in the Northeast!”

Dwight Gledhill, Deputy Director of NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Program, and Ru Morrison, Executive Director of Northeastern Regional Association of Coastal Ocean Observing Systems (NERACOOS), exclaimed after listening to a presentation on the newly formed California Current Acidification Network. Seeing how the West Coast was creating a collaboration of scientists, industry members, and managers on the West Coast inspired them to start a similar effort on the other side of the country in the Northeast US.

Thursday, August 26, 2021
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Addressing Ocean Acidification in a Vulnerable Region: The Alaska Ocean Acidification Network

NOAA OCEAN ACIDIFICATION PROGRAM

Ocean acidification is a global issue, driven by absorption of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, and it holds particular interest and concern for Alaskans. A primary reason is that Alaska water is cold, and cold water can hold more gas – just like a cold soda stays more fizzy than a warm one. This makes Alaska’s waters naturally more rich in carbon dioxide and thereby higher in acidity, placing it closer to the threshold that could be harmful to marine organisms. Since Alaska is home to a $6 billion dollar seafood industry and many communities that rely heavily on subsistence fishing, the stakes are high.
Wednesday, August 11, 2021
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