SOARCE ARCHIVE

Assessing risks of ocean acidification in south-central and southeast Alaska

Tom Hurst - NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center

Evaluating ocean acidification vulnerability and interactions among traditional and coastal Alaska industries

Why we care
Many marine species affected by ocean acidification (OA) contribute to Alaska’s highly productive commercial fisheries and traditional subsistence ways of life. Concern exists that acidification will cause ecosystem-level shifts, diminishing the overall economic value of commercial fisheries and reducing food security for communities relying on subsistence harvests. 

What we are doing
This project addresses acidification threats in south-central and southeast Alaska. It involves the development of decision support tools incorporating acidification risks into localized socio-ecological systems. The tools are based on a network of models representing acidification hazards, bio-ecological systems, and socioeconomic systems linked to adaptive actions.

Benefits of our work
This project is an exchange of knowledge between scientists, policy makers, and community stakeholders. The network of models creates decision support tools responsive to stakeholder concerns that reflect regional variation in community priorities and their ecological social and management context. The project synthesizes the best available science to determine the risks posed by ocean acidification.

Thursday, June 23, 2022

Funding Opportunity: Interagency Working Group on Research for Farming Seaweeds and Seagrasses

External Funding Opportunity Due June 1, 2022

The Bigelow Center for Seafood Solutions is excited to announce the request for applications for funding to support pilot studies relevant to the Interagency Working Group on Research for Farming of Seaweeds and Seagrasses, chaired by the USDA’s Agricultural Research Service and operating in partnership with the Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences' Center for Seafood Solutions.

Three $100,000 awards will be granted to academic institutions or research nonprofits leading new research endeavors aimed to (1) deacidify ocean environments, (2) produce feedstock for agriculture applications, OR (3) develop other scalable applications for seaweed, seagrasses, or products derived from them.

To apply, go to the application login page below and click "CREATE NEW ACCOUNT" to set up a new account:

https://www.grantinterface.com/Home/Logon?urlkey=bigelow

All applicant eligibility and application requirements can be found on the application homepage.

Submission Deadline: June 1, 2022 5PM EDT

Applications will be reviewed by an academic panel and awards made this August. 
Monday, April 25, 2022
Tags:

Pacific Islands Graduate Fellowship: Ocean acidification research and resilience

Letters of Intent due Dec. 14th, 2021, Full applications due March 11th, 2022

The NOAA Ocean Acidification Program (OAP) is supporting a competitive graduate fellowship that will support students conducting research, in pursuit of a Masters degree, related to ocean acidification (OA) in the Pacific Islands region to help fill a critical gap in capacity for OA research and monitoring in the region. OAP is seeking to fund students who would contribute to the body of knowledge on regional vulnerabilities to OA and potential solutions to build greater resilience against the impacts of OA. Successful applicants will conduct research that addresses physical/chemical oceanographic, biological, and/or socioeconomic questions and concepts. This funding call is part of a broader initiative, which involves multiple international scientific networks and capacity building organizations.

The goals of this fellowship are to (A) support early-career scientists who will provide the Pacific Islands region with ocean acidification research expertise, and (B) provide Pacific Island countries and communities with additional knowledge, information, and resources, which can be used to build greater resilience against acidification and its impacts. Please see Section III. Eligibility Information for a list of the prioritized Pacific Island countries.​ Subject to the availability of funding, OAP anticipates up to $300,000 USD total will be available to support approximately 3-6 graduate fellows, with each fellow funded at the approximate level of $20,000 - $32,000 USD per year for 2 years. Each award is intended to fund the fellow’s tuition, stipend, research budget, and/or other costs associated with completing a 2-year Masters degree program.

Informational webinar recording, presentation slides, and answers to FAQs are here. The full opportunity can be found here.  Letters of Intent due Dec. 14th, 2021. 

Example Letter of Intent: Word document, Adobe pdf

Template for Letters of Intent: Word document, Adobe pdf

Thursday, October 28, 2021
Tags:

The Northeast Coastal Acidification Network: A Force for Ocean Acidification Coordination

NOAA OCEAN ACIDIFICATION PROGRAM

“We need to do this in the Northeast!”

Dwight Gledhill, Deputy Director of NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Program, and Ru Morrison, Executive Director of Northeastern Regional Association of Coastal Ocean Observing Systems (NERACOOS), exclaimed after listening to a presentation on the newly formed California Current Acidification Network. Seeing how the West Coast was creating a collaboration of scientists, industry members, and managers on the West Coast inspired them to start a similar effort on the other side of the country in the Northeast US.

Thursday, August 26, 2021
Tags:

Addressing Ocean Acidification in a Vulnerable Region: The Alaska Ocean Acidification Network

NOAA OCEAN ACIDIFICATION PROGRAM

Ocean acidification is a global issue, driven by absorption of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, and it holds particular interest and concern for Alaskans. A primary reason is that Alaska water is cold, and cold water can hold more gas – just like a cold soda stays more fizzy than a warm one. This makes Alaska’s waters naturally more rich in carbon dioxide and thereby higher in acidity, placing it closer to the threshold that could be harmful to marine organisms. Since Alaska is home to a $6 billion dollar seafood industry and many communities that rely heavily on subsistence fishing, the stakes are high.
Wednesday, August 11, 2021
Tags:
RSS
12345678910Last