SOARCE ARCHIVE

Navigating Ocean Change with Jan Newton

Dr. Jan Newton is a biological oceanographer whose lifelong love of the Washington coast propelled her to an internationally recognized career. She shares her story, the importance of working together to address big challenges, and her vision for the future. 

Tuesday, March 29, 2022

Pacific Islands Graduate Fellowship: Ocean acidification research and resilience

Letters of Intent due Dec. 14th, 2021, Full applications due March 11th, 2022

The NOAA Ocean Acidification Program (OAP) is supporting a competitive graduate fellowship that will support students conducting research, in pursuit of a Masters degree, related to ocean acidification (OA) in the Pacific Islands region to help fill a critical gap in capacity for OA research and monitoring in the region. OAP is seeking to fund students who would contribute to the body of knowledge on regional vulnerabilities to OA and potential solutions to build greater resilience against the impacts of OA. Successful applicants will conduct research that addresses physical/chemical oceanographic, biological, and/or socioeconomic questions and concepts. This funding call is part of a broader initiative, which involves multiple international scientific networks and capacity building organizations.

The goals of this fellowship are to (A) support early-career scientists who will provide the Pacific Islands region with ocean acidification research expertise, and (B) provide Pacific Island countries and communities with additional knowledge, information, and resources, which can be used to build greater resilience against acidification and its impacts. Please see Section III. Eligibility Information for a list of the prioritized Pacific Island countries.​ Subject to the availability of funding, OAP anticipates up to $300,000 USD total will be available to support approximately 3-6 graduate fellows, with each fellow funded at the approximate level of $20,000 - $32,000 USD per year for 2 years. Each award is intended to fund the fellow’s tuition, stipend, research budget, and/or other costs associated with completing a 2-year Masters degree program.

Informational webinar recording, presentation slides, and answers to FAQs are here. The full opportunity can be found here.  Letters of Intent due Dec. 14th, 2021. 

Example Letter of Intent: Word document, Adobe pdf

Template for Letters of Intent: Word document, Adobe pdf

Thursday, October 28, 2021
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Scientists, scallop industry team up to study ocean acidification impacts

Scientists, scallop industry team up to study ocean acidification impacts

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

Guided by input from fishers, a team of scientists will bring together computer modeling and experiments to inform management policies for Northeast scallop fisheries facing the threat of ocean acidification.

Researchers from the University of Connecticut, NOAA’s Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC), Commercial Fisheries Research Foundation (CFRF), and Rutgers University will work together to study this economically and culturally significant resource for coastal communities in New England, with support from NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Program. Worth more than $500 million per year, scallops are the second most valuable fishery in the Northeast and are particularly vulnerable to ocean acidification.
Monday, January 25, 2021
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Assessing Vulnerability to a Changing Ocean: Investigating impact and option for adaptation

Assessing Vulnerability to a Changing Ocean: Investigating impact and option for adaptation

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

In certain areas of the US, marine resources and the communities that depend on them are particularly vulnerable to the impacts of ocean and coastal acidification along with other ocean changes. The NOAA Ocean Acidification Program recently awarded funding for three regional vulnerability assessment projects in the Chesapeake Bay, Northeast US and US West Coast. The projects bring together oceanographic, fisheries and aquaculture data and social science to assess vulnerability of dependent communities and industries, anticipate challenges they may face, and explore adaptations options.
Monday, December 21, 2020

Land locked to open ocean: Putting a pH sensor in the hands of students?

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

8.1. The current average pH of the ocean after being reduced significantly from decades of rampant carbon dioxide being pumped into the atmosphere, and ultimately, absorbed by our ocean. But how is pH measured? If a citizen scientist wants to see this for themselves, is it possible? Measuring ocean pH typically requires expensive equipment and trained operators. Commonly these instruments, while highly accurate, haven't been available to those outside of the scientific community. Recently, the curious mind and drive of William Pardis, a former student at Flathead Valley Community College, allowed this disconnect to be bridged with the development of the pHyter.
Thursday, October 1, 2020
Categories: FeaturedOA News
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