SOARCE ARCHIVE

Forging Connections between Industry and Scientists: The Start of the California Current Acidification Network

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

Over a decade ago, California sea urchin diver Bruce Steele discovered a scientific paper suggesting that sea urchins-the source of his livelihood-were facing a new threat called ocean acidification. At the time, there was very little research or information being shared among the West Coast fishing industry about how this change in ocean chemistry caused by the absorption of carbon dioxide emissions could impact sea urchins or other species.

Steele was hoping that the West Coast states could join together to address the potential impacts from ocean acidification to shellfish and fisheries.
Wednesday, August 4, 2021
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British Columbia to southern California: making headway with ocean change

NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory

On June 13, scientists aboard the NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown set out on the West Coast Ocean Acidification Research Cruise to characterize conditions along the West Coast of North America and continue to build a unique time-series of carbon and hydrographic measurements in areas expected to be highly impacted by ocean acidification. 
Wednesday, July 14, 2021
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10 years in the making: An inside look at NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Program with Director Libby Jewett

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

Libby Jewett, Ph.D., Director of the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program, provides insight into ocean acidification. Jewett highlights how she became involved in ocean acidification work, how NOAA's Ocean Acidification Program (OAP) started, and how we all can personally contribute to combatting this threat to our ocean.
Monday, June 7, 2021
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Scientists, scallop industry team up to study ocean acidification impacts

Scientists, scallop industry team up to study ocean acidification impacts

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

Guided by input from fishers, a team of scientists will bring together computer modeling and experiments to inform management policies for Northeast scallop fisheries facing the threat of ocean acidification.

Researchers from the University of Connecticut, NOAA’s Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC), Commercial Fisheries Research Foundation (CFRF), and Rutgers University will work together to study this economically and culturally significant resource for coastal communities in New England, with support from NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Program. Worth more than $500 million per year, scallops are the second most valuable fishery in the Northeast and are particularly vulnerable to ocean acidification.
Monday, January 25, 2021
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Assessing Vulnerability to a Changing Ocean: Investigating impact and option for adaptation

Assessing Vulnerability to a Changing Ocean: Investigating impact and option for adaptation

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

In certain areas of the US, marine resources and the communities that depend on them are particularly vulnerable to the impacts of ocean and coastal acidification along with other ocean changes. The NOAA Ocean Acidification Program recently awarded funding for three regional vulnerability assessment projects in the Chesapeake Bay, Northeast US and US West Coast. The projects bring together oceanographic, fisheries and aquaculture data and social science to assess vulnerability of dependent communities and industries, anticipate challenges they may face, and explore adaptations options.
Monday, December 21, 2020
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