SOARCE ARCHIVE

Scientists, scallop industry team up to study ocean acidification impacts

Scientists, scallop industry team up to study ocean acidification impacts

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

Guided by input from fishers, a team of scientists will bring together computer modeling and experiments to inform management policies for Northeast scallop fisheries facing the threat of ocean acidification.

Researchers from the University of Connecticut, NOAA’s Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC), Commercial Fisheries Research Foundation (CFRF), and Rutgers University will work together to study this economically and culturally significant resource for coastal communities in New England, with support from NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Program. Worth more than $500 million per year, scallops are the second most valuable fishery in the Northeast and are particularly vulnerable to ocean acidification.
Monday, January 25, 2021
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Assessing Vulnerability to a Changing Ocean: Investigating impact and option for adaptation

Assessing Vulnerability to a Changing Ocean: Investigating impact and option for adaptation

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

In certain areas of the US, marine resources and the communities that depend on them are particularly vulnerable to the impacts of ocean and coastal acidification along with other ocean changes. The NOAA Ocean Acidification Program recently awarded funding for three regional vulnerability assessment projects in the Chesapeake Bay, Northeast US and US West Coast. The projects bring together oceanographic, fisheries and aquaculture data and social science to assess vulnerability of dependent communities and industries, anticipate challenges they may face, and explore adaptations options.
Monday, December 21, 2020
Ocean Acidification: Building on a Foundation at the Flower Garden Banks Sanctuary

Ocean Acidification: Building on a Foundation at the Flower Garden Banks Sanctuary

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

Looking up at high-rise buildings, towering cathedrals, or the great pyramids at Giza; the feats of man seem unimaginable. The key to these massive architectural achievements is laying a quality foundation. Dr. Xinping Hu, an associate professor at Texas A&M Corpus Christi University, knows that a solid foundation is very important in science as well. Together with his co-investigators at NOAA’s Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Lab (AOML), Texas A&M University, and Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, Dr. Hu will be building upon a foundation of data collected both at and near the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary (NMS) in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico to better characterize the changes in ocean chemistry over space and time in these waters.

There are many facets to a strong structure, architectural or scientific. Having the right tools and site to build, along with a skilled team of craftsmen, and an insightful foreman are all integral to conduct impactful science.


Thursday, November 7, 2019
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Optimizing Acidification Observations In A Changing Ocean

Optimizing Acidification Observations In A Changing Ocean

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

There are hundreds if not thousands of eyes on our changing ocean at any moment: Buoys, gliders, saildrones and ships measure carbonate chemistry and new ocean observing technologies are continually being created to monitor ocean acidification. As science and technology progress it is important to ensure that the most up to date knowledge is applied to the task at hand. NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Program (OAP) is teaming up with the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS®) to fund four projects aimed at improving the observing system design for characterizing ocean acidification. This work will evaluate the capability of existing observations to characterize the magnitude and extent of acidification and explore alternative regional ocean acidification observing approaches. Ultimately this work will minimize errors in measurements, better integrate existing observations, and minimize costs of monitoring ocean acidification.

Learn more about this exciting work here!

Tuesday, September 10, 2019
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New NOAA, partner buoy in American Samoa opens window into a changing ocean

New NOAA, partner buoy in American Samoa opens window into a changing ocean

NOAA Research

NOAA and partners have launched a new buoy in Fagatele Bay within NOAA’s National Marine Sanctuary of American Samoa to measure the amount of carbon dioxide in the waters around a vibrant tropical coral reef ecosystem.

“This new monitoring effort in a remote area of the Pacific Ocean will not only advance our understanding of changing ocean chemistry in this valuable and vibrant coral ecosystem but will also help us communicate these changes to diverse stakeholders in the Pacific Islands and across the United States,” said Derek Manzello, coral ecologist with NOAA’s Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory.


Thursday, May 23, 2019
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