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Assessing Vulnerability to a Changing Ocean: Investigating impact and option for adaptation

Assessing Vulnerability to a Changing Ocean: Investigating impact and option for adaptation

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

In certain areas of the US, marine resources and the communities that depend on them are particularly vulnerable to the impacts of ocean and coastal acidification along with other ocean changes. The NOAA Ocean Acidification Program recently awarded funding for three regional vulnerability assessment projects in the Chesapeake Bay, Northeast US and US West Coast. The projects bring together oceanographic, fisheries and aquaculture data and social science to assess vulnerability of dependent communities and industries, anticipate challenges they may face, and explore adaptations options.
Monday, December 21, 2020

Land locked to open ocean: Putting a pH sensor in the hands of students?

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

8.1. The current average pH of the ocean after being reduced significantly from decades of rampant carbon dioxide being pumped into the atmosphere, and ultimately, absorbed by our ocean. But how is pH measured? If a citizen scientist wants to see this for themselves, is it possible? Measuring ocean pH typically requires expensive equipment and trained operators. Commonly these instruments, while highly accurate, haven't been available to those outside of the scientific community. Recently, the curious mind and drive of William Pardis, a former student at Flathead Valley Community College, allowed this disconnect to be bridged with the development of the pHyter.
Thursday, October 1, 2020
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Gliding into the Future of Ocean Acidification Observing

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

The technology used to observe ocean acidification - the shift in ocean chemistry driven by an increase in the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere due to the burning of fossil fuels and other human activities - has followed the same trend of innovation and scaling as computer technology. Measuring ocean chemistry traditionally involves a team of scientists to collect samples at sea and an entire lab team to analytically determine the carbonate chemistry by measuring multiple parameters, including pH. While these methods are still being used, innovations in technology have made continuous pH sampling in our ocean possible. Dr. Grace Saba, an assistant professor at Rutgers University, has worked to develop a new sensor and is leading a project that will combine this new technology, existing data, and modeling to optimize the ocean acidification observing network in the Northeast US.
Wednesday, January 29, 2020
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Marine Shellfish Populations Estimated to be at Risk from Ocean Acidification

Marine Shellfish Populations Estimated to be at Risk from Ocean Acidification

NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Sciences

The absorption of rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) into the oceans has caused ocean acidification and associated shifts in marine carbonate chemistry. In coastal waters, excessive nutrient runoff can also create regions of low oxygen, high CO2, and acidification. These conditions have been shown to be detrimental to growth and survival of larval and juvenile shellfish such as oysters, clams and scallops in laboratory studies, but the consequences of these effects on wild populations have been unknown.

Now, a new publication shows that the levels of impairment observed in laboratory experiments have the potential to cause increased risk to wild populations of marine bivalves in the northeastern USA.

Monday, January 27, 2020
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Letters of Intent Due January 24th, 2020

FEDERAL FUNDING OPPORTUNITY: Regional Vulnerability Assessments for Ocean Acidification

The Ocean Acidification Program is soliciting proposals for collaborative projects of up to 3 years in duration that synthesize ocean acidification information at a regional scale (e.g. Large Marine Ecosystem, large estuary or collection of small estuaries, and state or collection of states in US waters) to determine where societal vulnerabilities to ocean acidification exist or are emerging, in order to provide actionable information for marine resource decision makers. This funding opportunity will not support the collection of new chemical or ecological observations or species response data. Social science data collection is permitted.

Information about this opportunity can be found here:https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html?keywords=11.017 This grant is Funding Opportunity Number: NOAA-OAR-OAP-2020-2006333.  Email Letters of Intent to erica.h.ombres@noaa.gov. Full proposals should be submitted through grants.gov

Important dates:  Letters of Intent are due January 24th and full proposals are due March 27th. 

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Monday, November 25, 2019
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