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Increased Ocean Acidity Puts Alaska Fisheries At Risk, Study Says

Increased Ocean Acidity Puts Alaska Fisheries At Risk, Study Says

Becky Bohrer (Associated Press)

JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — The release of carbon dioxide into the air from power plant smokestacks to the tailpipe on your car could pose a risk to red king crab and other lucrative fisheries in Alaska, a new report says.

Ocean water becomes more acidic when it absorbs carbon dioxide released by human sources, such as the burning of fossil fuels. Increased ocean acidification could harm important Alaska commercial and subsistence fisheries and communities that rely heavily on them, according to the new research aimed at spurring discussion on how to address the changes.

Tuesday, July 29, 2014
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NOAA-led study shows Alaska fisheries and communities at risk from ocean acidification

NOAA-led study shows Alaska fisheries and communities at risk from ocean acidification

NOAA Research

Ocean acidification is driving changes in waters vital to Alaska’s valuable commercial fisheries and subsistence way of life, according to new NOAA-led research that will be published online in Progress in Oceanography.

Many of Alaska’s nutritionally and economically valuable marine fisheries are located in waters that are already experiencing ocean acidification, and will see more in the near future, the study shows. Communities in southeast and southwest Alaska face the highest risk from ocean acidification because they rely heavily on fisheries that are expected to be most affected by ocean acidification, and have underlying factors that make those communities more vulnerable, such as lower incomes and fewer employment opportunities.

Tuesday, July 29, 2014
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Pacific island is natural laboratory to study ocean acidification

Pacific island is natural laboratory to study ocean acidification

NOAA Research

Ian Enochs, a scientist with NOAA’s Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies at the University of Miami, traveled in May to the Island of Maug in the Pacific Ocean as part of a NOAA expedition aboard NOAA Ship Hi’ialakai to study coral reef ecosystems. We caught up with Enochs to learn about his research on underwater vents that seep carbon dioxide into the Pacific.

Why journey to the Island of Maug to study ocean acidification?

Maug is a unique natural laboratory that allows us to study how ocean acidification affects coral reef ecosystems. We know of no other area like this in U.S. waters. Increasing carbon dioxide in seawater is a global issue because it makes it harder for animals like corals to build skeletons

Tuesday, July 1, 2014
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Scientists warn ocean food supply may be impacted by rising CO2

Scientists warn ocean food supply may be impacted by rising CO2

NBC News

Marine biologists are searching for evidence of what our oceans will look like if carbon dioxide levels continue to increase. Thirty percent of the carbon dioxide, or CO2, released into the atmosphere is absorbed by the ocean, leading to a process called acidification. Shellfish and coral reefs are particularly impacted, according to Jason Hall-Spencer of Plymouth University. “We’ve never put this much carbon dioxide into the ocean before,” he said. “It’s never happened before in Earth’s history. Not this quickly.” NBC’s Ann Curry reports.
Sunday, April 6, 2014
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Sea Change: Food for Millions at Risk

Sea Change: Food for Millions at Risk

The Seattle Times

A remote Indonesian village highlights the threats facing millions of people who depend on marine creatures susceptible to souring seas and ocean warming.

Wednesday, January 15, 2014
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