BUOYS & MOORINGS
SHIP SURVEYS
GLIDERS
SHIPS OF OPPORTUNITY
CORAL REEF MONITORING

 

MONITORING

Understanding the exposure of the nation’s living marine resources such as shellfish and corals to changing ocean chemistry is a primary goal for the NOAA OAP. Repeat hydrographic surveys, ship-based surface observations, and time series stations (mooring and ship-based) in the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans have allowed us to begin to understand the long-term changes in carbonate chemistry in response to ocean acidification.


Buoys & Moorings

There are currently 19 OAP-supported buoys in coastal, open-ocean and coral reef waters which contribute to NOAA's Ocean Acidification Monitoring Program, with other deployments planned.

Currently, there are two types of floating devices which instruments can be added in order to measure various ocean characteristics - buoys and wave gliders. Buoys are moored, allowing them to remain stationary and for scientists to get measurements from the same place over time. The time series created from these measurements are key to understanding how ocean chemistry is changing over time. There are also buoys moored in the open-ocean and near coral reef ecosystems to monitor the changes in the carbonate chemistry in these ecosystems. The MAP CO2 sensors on these buoys measure pCO2 every three hours.

Access our buoy data

 


Ship surveys

Research cruises are a way to collect information about a certain ecosystem or area of interest.

For decades, scientists have learned about physical, chemical and biological properties of the ocean and coasts by observations made at sea. Measurements taken during research cruises can be used to validate data taken by autonomous instruments. One instrument often used on research cruises is a conductivity, temperature, and depth sensor (CTD), which measures the physical state of the water (temperature, salinity, and depth). The sensor often goes in the water on a rosette, which also carries niskin bottles used to collect water samples from various depths in the water column. Numerous chemical and biological properties can be measured from water collected in niskin bottles.


Ships of Opportunity

Ships of Opportunity (SOPs) or Volunteer Observing Ships (VOSs) are vessels at sea for other reasons than ocean acidification studies, such as commercial cargo ships or ferries.

The owners of these vessels allow scientific instrumentation that measures ocean acidification (OA) parameters to be installed and collect data while the ship is underway. This allows data on ocean chemistry to be collected in many remote areas of the world's ocean, such as high latitude waters, long distances from land (e.g. mid-basin waters), and places not easily accessible by research cruises. These partnerships have greatly increased the spatial coverage of OA monitoring world-wide. To learn more, check out the Ships of Opportunity programs established by the NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) and the NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic Marine Laboratory (AOML).


Wave Gliders

Scientists at the NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) are working with engineers at Liquid Robotics, Inc. to optimize a Carbon Wave Glider.

This instrument (pictured above) can be driven via satellite from land. Carbon Wave Gliders can be outfitted with pCO2, pH, oxygen, temperature and salinity sensors, and the glider’s equipment takes measurements as it moves through the water. The glider’s motion is driven by wave energy, and its sensors are powered through solar cells and batteries, when needed.


CORAL REEF MONITORING

NOAA’s Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) in partnership with OAP is engaged in a coordinated and targeted series of field observations, moorings and ecological monitoring efforts in coral reef ecosystems.

These efforts are designed to document the dynamics of ocean acidification (OA) in coral reef systems and track the status and trends in ecosystem response. This effort serves as a subset of a broader CRCP initiative referred to as the National Coral Reef Monitoring Plan, which was established to support conservation of the Nation’s coral reef ecosystems. The OAP contributes to this plan through overseeing and coordinating carbonate chemistry monitoring. This monitoring includes a broadly distributed spatial water sampling campaign complemented by a more limited set of moored instruments deployed at a small subset of representative sites in both the Atlantic/Caribbean and Pacific regions. Coral reef carbonate chemistry monitoring is implemented by researchers at the NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic & Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) and NOAA's PIFSC Coral Reef Ecosystems Division.

 

LEARN MORE ABOUT HOW WE MEASURE CORAL REEF CHANGE


OAP SUPPORTED MONITORING PROJECTS

Marine Scientist Position with focus on Ocean Acidification

State of Washington Department of Ecology

The Environmental Assessment Program (EAP) program within the Department of Ecology is looking to fill a Marine Scientist (Natural Resource Scientist 2) position. Applications are due April 24, 2018.

This position is located at our Headquarters Building in Lacey, WA but conducts work statewide. This position is responsible for conducting marine water quality monitoring, with a focus on ocean acidification. Responsibilities include implementing the addition of ocean acidification-relevant parameters to Ecology's marine waters monitoring program in Puget Sound. This position is also responsible for oceanographic sampling gear preparation and use, instrument calibration (CTD and other electronic sensors), laboratory sample analyses, data analysis, and report writing. The data collected is used to determine the status and trends of marine water quality in context to ocean acidification in Washington state.

More information here

Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemical Oceanography

University of Delaware

The University of Delaware (UD) College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment is seeking applications for a Postdoctoral Research Scientist position in chemical oceanography and metrology. The successful candidate will work on a NOAA funded project to aid in the development of a reference material for ocean pH by establishing traceability of pH indicator dyes to the International System of Units (SI). The scholar will make use of state-of-the-art analytical and experimental facilities at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Candidates must have a PhD in either chemical oceanography, analytical chemistry, or a closely related field. Demonstrated skills with spectrophotometry, potentiometry, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and/or physical chemistry are preferred. The position will be located at the NIST facility in Gaithersburg, MD, but the appointment will be made through the University of Delaware. The postdoc will also attend field test cruises with the UD group. The appointment will be for one year, with continuation pending funding and progress.

Please contact Wei-Jun Cai (wcai@udel.edu) and Regina Easley (regina.easley@nist.gov) for additional information.

Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Mid-Atlantic Ocean Acidification Graduate Fellowship Opportunity

Ocean Acidification Program and Sea Grant

The Mid-Atlantic Sea Grant Programs in partnership with the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program, are pleased to announce the availability of Ocean Acidification Graduate Research Fellowships for a two-year period covering the 2018 and 2019 academic years. The fellowship is open to full-time graduate students at any academic institution in Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, New York and Virginia who are engaged in coastal and marine research relevant to regional ocean, coastal, and estuarine acidification. The focus should be on improving understanding of the potential ecological consequences of increasing carbon dioxide concentration in regional coastal waters. Projects may encompass natural and/or social science research topics.

Proposals are being accepted through 5:00 pm ET on Friday, April 13, 2018 via eSeaGrant.  

This announcement and additional information can be found on each state Sea Grant program’s website.


Monday, March 5, 2018

Postdoctoral opportunity: NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO inorganic carbon, pH, and oxygen DYNAMICS

University of Delaware

Applications are being accepted for a Postdoctoral Research Associate position at the School of Marine Science and Policy, the University of Delaware working with Dr. Wei-Jun Cai, available immediately. This NSF-funded project focuses on the dynamics of inorganic carbon, pH, and oxygen as well as the interactions between ocean acidification and coastal ocean eutrophication in the Mississippi River plume and Northern Gulf of Mexico hypoxic region.

Wednesday, September 14, 2016

PhD opportunity: Impacts of ocean acidification on the –omics responses in green-shell mussels

University of Auckland

The School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, New Zealand, invites applications for a PhD project on the transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic responses of green-shell mussels to ocean acidification. This project is part of the CARIM project – (https://www.niwa.co.nz/coasts-and-oceans/research-projects/carim-coastal-acidification-rate-impacts-management) which examines the ecosystem effects of ocean acidification on primary production, food quality and habitat availability, with a particular focus on the sensitivity of the different life stages of iconic NZ species including pāua, greenshell mussel and snapper larvae.

Wednesday, August 31, 2016
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