Postdoctural Opportunity: Responses of farmed shellfish to mutiple stressors

Rutgers University

The Haskin Shellifsh Research Lab at Rutgers University is seeking a postdoctoral research associate to join a dynamic research team on a project that will involve both field-based and laboratory-based experiments.The postdoc will be responsible for coordinating experiments which will include farm-scale grow-out experiments in the ocean, lab-scale multi-stressor (temperature and ocean acidification) experiments in the hatchery, meetings with industry and management collaborators, and writing reports and manuscripts about results. Opportunities for grant writing, undergraduate student mentoring, and presentations at science conferences will be encouraged. Funding is in place for 18 monthsand will include travel to meet with project collaborators and advisors from management and fishing communities.

Find more information and apply here.

Wednesday, November 3, 2021
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Pacific Islands Graduate Fellowship: Ocean acidification research and resilience

Letters of Intent due Dec. 14th, 2021, Full applications due March 11th, 2022

The NOAA Ocean Acidification Program (OAP) is supporting a competitive graduate fellowship that will support students conducting research, in pursuit of a Masters degree, related to ocean acidification (OA) in the Pacific Islands region to help fill a critical gap in capacity for OA research and monitoring in the region. OAP is seeking to fund students who would contribute to the body of knowledge on regional vulnerabilities to OA and potential solutions to build greater resilience against the impacts of OA. Successful applicants will conduct research that addresses physical/chemical oceanographic, biological, and/or socioeconomic questions and concepts. This funding call is part of a broader initiative, which involves multiple international scientific networks and capacity building organizations.

The goals of this fellowship are to (A) support early-career scientists who will provide the Pacific Islands region with ocean acidification research expertise, and (B) provide Pacific Island countries and communities with additional knowledge, information, and resources, which can be used to build greater resilience against acidification and its impacts. Please see Section III. Eligibility Information for a list of the prioritized Pacific Island countries.​ Subject to the availability of funding, OAP anticipates up to $300,000 USD total will be available to support approximately 3-6 graduate fellows, with each fellow funded at the approximate level of $20,000 - $32,000 USD per year for 2 years. Each award is intended to fund the fellow’s tuition, stipend, research budget, and/or other costs associated with completing a 2-year Masters degree program.

Informational webinar recording, presentation slides, and answers to FAQs are here. The full opportunity can be found here.  Letters of Intent due Dec. 14th, 2021. 

Example Letter of Intent: Word document, Adobe pdf

Template for Letters of Intent: Word document, Adobe pdf

Thursday, October 28, 2021
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The Northeast Coastal Acidification Network: A Force for Ocean Acidification Coordination

NOAA OCEAN ACIDIFICATION PROGRAM

“We need to do this in the Northeast!”

Dwight Gledhill, Deputy Director of NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Program, and Ru Morrison, Executive Director of Northeastern Regional Association of Coastal Ocean Observing Systems (NERACOOS), exclaimed after listening to a presentation on the newly formed California Current Acidification Network. Seeing how the West Coast was creating a collaboration of scientists, industry members, and managers on the West Coast inspired them to start a similar effort on the other side of the country in the Northeast US.

Thursday, August 26, 2021
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Addressing Ocean Acidification in a Vulnerable Region: The Alaska Ocean Acidification Network

NOAA OCEAN ACIDIFICATION PROGRAM

Ocean acidification is a global issue, driven by absorption of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, and it holds particular interest and concern for Alaskans. A primary reason is that Alaska water is cold, and cold water can hold more gas – just like a cold soda stays more fizzy than a warm one. This makes Alaska’s waters naturally more rich in carbon dioxide and thereby higher in acidity, placing it closer to the threshold that could be harmful to marine organisms. Since Alaska is home to a $6 billion dollar seafood industry and many communities that rely heavily on subsistence fishing, the stakes are high.
Wednesday, August 11, 2021
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Workshop Report Defines Agenda for Integrated Research on HABs and Ocean Acidification

National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science

NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Program (OAP) and NCCOS have published the proceedings of the virtual Harmful Algal Blooms and Ocean Acidification Workshop in a NOAA Technical Memorandum (OAR-OAP-3). Over 70 scientists, managers and stakeholders met August 11-13, 2020 to identify needs and priorities to advance research on ocean acidification (OA) and harmful algal blooms (HABs) as co-stressors in coastal ecosystems.
Monday, August 9, 2021
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