Undergraduate Research Internship Opportunities

Mook Sea Farm & SEANET

Two ocean acidification-related undergraduate research internship opportunities are avaiable this summer at Mook Sea Farm in Walpole, ME supported by SEANET.  These opportunities are open to undergraduate students from or attending university in Maine.

The Aquaculture in changing waters: Impacts of ocean acidification on juvenile oysters opportunity is directly related to ocean acidification and the aquaculture industry.  The second internship, Environmental influence on larval bivalve settlement success, will consider the effects of several environmental variables, including pCO2, pH, and saturation state, on larval bivalve settlement in a field study.

Applications will be reviewed beginning February 18. 2019. Please direct questions to me, Meredith White, meredith.megan.white@gmail.com.

Thursday, January 31, 2019
Tags:

2019 Request for Proposals

Washington Sea Grant

Washington Sea Grant (WSG) requests proposals for one- to-two-year projects from investigators at academic, research and education institutions throughout the state of Washington. Funded projects will contribute to WSG and state priority information needs by advancing knowledge in one of four focus areas: healthy coastal ecosystems; sustainable fisheries and aquaculture; resilient communities and economies; and ocean literacy and workforce development.
 
About $2 million will be awarded during the two-year funding cycle through a competitive review process.
 
Proposals must follow the guidelines detailed in the 2019 Request for Proposals and be submitted through eSeaGrant, WSG’s online proposal submission system. Note: eSeaGrant will open for investigators to start a preliminary proposal on January 28, 2019.

Wednesday, January 30, 2019
Tags:

Federal Funding Opportunity: Regional Ocean Acidification Observing Optimization Study

NOAA OCEAN ACIDIFICATION PROGRAM

The NOAA/OAR/Ocean Acidification Program (OAP) is soliciting proposals for studies investigating ocean acidification monitoring strategies that would offer an observing system design that best characterizes and tracks ocean acidification within U.S. Large Marine Ecosystems (LMEs) optimized towards characterizing the conditions most relevant to ecologically and economically important marine species.

Letters of intent due February 5th, 2019 (EXTENDED Deadline)

More info here:  https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html?keywords=11.017

 

 

Thursday, November 1, 2018
Tags:
Ocean acidification may reduce sea scallop fisheries

Ocean acidification may reduce sea scallop fisheries

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

A new model created by scientists at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution projects - under a worst- case scenario - that warming and increasingly acidic waters could reduce the sea scallop population by more than 50% in the next 30 to 80 years. The bright spot? Fisheries management and efforts to reduce CO2 emissions, might slow or even stop that trend for this $500 million fishery.


Thursday, October 4, 2018
Tags:

How sensitive are systems in the Chesapeake Bay to acidification and nutrient pollution?

Jeremy Testa, University of Maryland

The wild oyster industry has suffered repeated collapses in the Chesapeake Bay due to overharvesting, disease, and declining environmental conditions. How future conditions will affect the Eastern oyster remain uncertain, not only because these conditions such as increased freshwater are difficult to predict , but also because the interactions between stressors such as ocean acidification, temperature, nutrient runoff and sea level rise could lead to unexpected chemical, biological, and economic change. The changes in stressors and their impacts do not always proceed in a straight line.The potential responses of various life stages of the Eastern oyster to stressors like acidification and eutrophication has received little attention. This project will study the impact of different stressors to Chesapeake Bay, a large estuarine system, and the Eastern oyster. The study will bring together different models to understand the relationship between biogeochemical cycling of carbon, oxygen, and nutrients, oyster growth and survival, and oyster economic profitability in the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. The project will provide insights into future conditions and habitats where aquaculture and wild oyster populations may be most vulnerable to the climate and ocean changes.
Tuesday, October 2, 2018
RSS
12345678910Last