Next-Gen gene sequencing to understand effects of ocean acidification on Alaskan crab and fish

Chris Long - NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center

Using next-generation sequencing techniques to assess adaptive capacity and illuminate mechanisms underlying the effects of high pCO2 on Alaskan crab and fish species

Why we care
Many economically important crab and fish species are negatively affected by exposure to ocean acidification predicted to occur throughout their ranges in the coming decades. Ocean acidification results in decreased growth, altered development, weaker exoskeletons, increased energy outputs, altered immune systems, altered behavior, and increased mortality in some of these species. Other stressors such as increased temperature can have interactive negative effects when combined with ocean acidification. Traditional laboratory experiments cannot duplicate the gradual changes that will affect species populations over multiple life-history stages and generations, so using next-generation genetic approaches provide insight into effects beyond specific life stages.

What we are doing 
This study will use next-generation sequencing techniques to identify specific alterations in the molecular, metabolic, and physiological pathways of individuals exposed to ocean acidification. This is a way to identify pathways that impart tolerance to ocean acidification and warming. This project determines the effect of ocean acidification and thermal stress on gene expression in Pacific cod larvae and juvenile Tanner crab and identifies genetic markers indicating ocean acidification resilience. 

Benefits of our work
Investigators will identify the cellular pathways that impart tolerance to ocean acidification. By comparing individuals that demonstrate low sensitivity to ocean acidification and with the general population, we enhance the ability to predict how adaptation will alter the species’ response to future ocean conditions. This research will inform the fishing industry and coastal, fisheries-dependent Alaskan communities about potential effects of ocean change on commercially important species. Outcomes can be used to drive future responses and adaptations in these industries regarding affected fisheries.

Thursday, May 26, 2022

NOAA RESTORE Funding Competition on Long Term Trends

NOAA RESTORE Science Program

The priority for this competition is identifying, tracking, understanding, and/or predicting trends and variability in the Gulf of Mexico’s living coastal and marine resources and the processes driving them.

Applicants must propose work that addresses this priority in one or more of these areas of emphasis: 1) exploring trends in multiple species, 2) investigating the link between weather and/or climate and trends, and 3) examining the relationship between trends and economic activity.

To receive funding, applicants will need to directly address the needs of resource managers and have a clear plan for how their research findings or products will be used by resource managers. Applicants are encouraged to include resource managers on their project teams.

This competition is the Science Program’s first dedicated to supporting integrated, long-term projects. Pre-proposals, which are required, are due by July 30, 2018and the deadline for submitting a full application is October 29, 2018. Please see the full announcement for complete instructions on how to submit a pre-proposal and full application. 

Wednesday, June 6, 2018
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Webinar: 4th National Climate Assessment: Oceans and Marine Resources Chapter, Public Feedback

Andy Pershing, Gulf of Maine Research Institute & Fred Lipschultz, US Global Change Research Program

Join us for a webinar on Monday, March 20th to provide feedback on the 4th National Climate Assessment!

Time: 3:00pm EST (12:00pm PST)

Presented by: Andy Pershing, Gulf of Maine Research Institute, Chapter Lead Autho

Fred Lipschultz, US Global Change Research Program, USGCRP Chapter Contact

Register: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7271981171002454017

The National Climate Assessment (NCA) is produced every four years by the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP). The NCA aims to integrate new information on climate science into the context of larger social, ecological, and policy systems. It will provide an updated report of climate change impacts and vulnerability, evaluate the effectiveness of mitigation and adaptation activities, and identify knowledge gaps. Oceans and Marine Resources has been identified as one of the national-level overview chapters to be included in the 2018 national report.  The purpose of the presentation is to provide a brief background on the NCA, present the tentative key findings/outline, and seek public feedback.  During this webinar, the audience can provide feedback on the major issues facing the oceans and the effects these will have on the United States.

If you cannot attend the webinar but would still like to submit suggestions for the NCA4: Oceans Chapter, please submit comments here: 

Thursday, March 9, 2017
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NOAA Funds Seven New Projects to Increase Understanding and Response to Climate Impacts on U.S. Fisheries

NOAA Funds Seven New Projects to Increase Understanding and Response to Climate Impacts on U.S. Fisheries

NOAA

NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology has teamed up with the NOAA Research Climate Program Office to study the impacts of a changing climate on the fish and fisheries of the Northeast Shelf Large Marine Ecosystem. Together, these offices are providing $5.0 million in grant funding over the next three years to support seven new projects.

Tuesday, December 15, 2015
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The Point of No Return: Climate Change Nightmares Are Already Here

The Point of No Return: Climate Change Nightmares Are Already Here

Rolling Stone

The impacts of ocean acidification on marine species may be occurring earlier than expected. Scientists from the NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC), Bill Peterson​, and NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL), Dr. Simone Alin and Dr. Nina Bednarsek,​ are featured in an article by The Rolling Stone discussing the imminent threat of ocean acidification on marine species in the most vulnerable regions around the globe, such as the Pacific Northwest.

Wednesday, August 5, 2015
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