NOAA research links human-caused CO2 emissions to dissolving sea snail shells off U.S. West Coast

NOAA research links human-caused CO2 emissions to dissolving sea snail shells off U.S. West Coast

NOAA

For the first time, NOAA and partner scientists have connected the concentration of human-caused carbon dioxide in waters off the U.S. Pacific coast to the dissolving of shells of microscopic marine sea snails called pteropods.

“This is the first time we’ve been able to tease out the percentage of human-caused carbon dioxide from natural carbon dioxide along a large portion of the West Coast and link it directly to pteropod shell dissolution,” said Richard Feely, a NOAA senior scientist who led the research appearing in Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science. “Our research shows that humans are increasing the acidification of U.S. West Coast coastal waters, making it more difficult for marine species to build strong shells.”

Wednesday, November 23, 2016
NOAA and Sea Grant fund $800,000 in research to understand effects of ocean changes on iconic Northeast marine life

NOAA and Sea Grant fund $800,000 in research to understand effects of ocean changes on iconic Northeast marine life

NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Program (OAP) and the Northeast Sea Grant Programs joined together to prioritize and fund new research on how ocean acidification is affecting marine life including lobsters, clams, oysters, mussels and sand lance that are so important to the Northeast region. Funding includes $800,000 in federal funds from the two programs with an additional $400,000 non-federal match.
Tuesday, September 6, 2016
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BENEATH THE WAVES, CLIMATE CHANGE PUTS MARINE LIFE ON THE MOVE

BENEATH THE WAVES, CLIMATE CHANGE PUTS MARINE LIFE ON THE MOVE

The Connecticut Mirror

The Connecticut Mirror details the changes in marine species distributions in New England and what this could mean for the future of fisheries in the region.

Monday, September 5, 2016
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Acidic sea water affects growth of oysters

WCSH6 PORTLAND

Over ninety percent of Maine's oyster harvest comes from the Damariscotta River. 

Mook Sea Farm in Walpole has been operating along the river for over thirty years and owner Bill Mook is worried about the impact of ocean acidification on his crop.

Thursday, July 14, 2016
Studies testing kelp to ease effects of ocean acidification

Studies testing kelp to ease effects of ocean acidification

The Seattle Times

A team of scientists is investigating whether growing kelp can reduce carbon-dioxide levels in the inland marine waters of Puget Sound. They also want to find ways to market that harvested kelp for food, fuels or fertilizers.

Thursday, July 14, 2016
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