Latest Science Updates to the 2012 WA State Blue Ribbon Panel Report

Latest Science Updates to the 2012 WA State Blue Ribbon Panel Report

Marine Resources Advisory Council

The Washington state governor’s appointed board, the Marine Resources Advisory Council, released its first update in five years to the state’s coordinated response to ocean acidification. In the five years since the Blue Ribbon Panel’s report, there have been significant scientific advances and progress made on the 42 recommended actions. The report highlights the new research that justifies more concerted efforts to combat ocean acidification. The report is publicly available here

Eleven NOAA and Washington Sea Grant scientists from the National Ocean Service, National Marine Fisheries Service and the Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research served on the Blue Ribbon “Refresh” Panel and contributed to the report.

Photo Credit: NW Straits Commission

Wednesday, December 20, 2017

Future Park Leaders of Emerging Change

National Park Service

The National Park Service (NPS) is pleased to support the Future Park Leaders of Emerging Change (FPL) program as a pathway for exemplary students in higher education (advanced undergraduate students, graduate students, and recent graduates) to apply their skills and ideas to park-based challenges and solutions. One Position is to "Develop an Ocean Acidification Action Toolkit for Our National Parks" at the Olympic National Park .

The Initiative offers 12-week paid internships which allow students to gain valuable work experience, explore career options, and develop leadership skills through mentorship and guidance while helping to advance NPS efforts on emerging management issues. Successful students may be eligible for non-competitive hire into federal positions for which they qualify following completion of all academic requirements. For more information visit the future park leaders website


Monday, December 11, 2017
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Oysters on acid: How the ocean's declining pH will change the way we eat

Oysters on acid: How the ocean's declining pH will change the way we eat

The New Food Economy

The ocean is changing faster than it has in the last 66 million years. Now, Oregon oysters are being farmed in Hawaii. That fix won’t work forever. 

A little more than ten years ago, a mysterious epidemic wiped out baby oyster populations. After two years of massive losses and no answers, scientists testing the waters discovered what was really wrong: the ocean water flowing into the hatcheries had changed, and the oysters weren’t able to build their shells. 

Check out the full article by H. Claire Brown, The New Food Economy, 28 November 2017.

Saturday, December 2, 2017

Natural Resource Specialist 2 (Ocean Acidification Assistand Project Leader)

Fish division of the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

This position is in the Marine Resources Program (MRP) administered by the Fish division of the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) located in Newport, Oregon. For more information on this position visit: Natural Resource Specialist 2.

Monday, October 23, 2017
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OAP Helps Build Ocean Acidification Capacity for Pacific Island Nations

OCTOBER 23rd, 2017

NOAA scientists and OAP staff will be educating and training scientists on ocean acidification monitoring in Suva, Fiji on 30 Oct - 10 Nov 2017. Scientists from several Pacific Island nations will convene at the University of the South Pacific to learn best methods for measuring ocean chemistry from experts in the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network. 

Monday, October 23, 2017
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