Addressing Ocean Acidification in a Vulnerable Region: The Alaska Ocean Acidification Network

NOAA OCEAN ACIDIFICATION PROGRAM

Ocean acidification is a global issue, driven by absorption of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, and it holds particular interest and concern for Alaskans. A primary reason is that Alaska water is cold, and cold water can hold more gas – just like a cold soda stays more fizzy than a warm one. This makes Alaska’s waters naturally more rich in carbon dioxide and thereby higher in acidity, placing it closer to the threshold that could be harmful to marine organisms. Since Alaska is home to a $6 billion dollar seafood industry and many communities that rely heavily on subsistence fishing, the stakes are high.
Wednesday, August 11, 2021
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Workshop Report Defines Agenda for Integrated Research on HABs and Ocean Acidification

National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science

NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Program (OAP) and NCCOS have published the proceedings of the virtual Harmful Algal Blooms and Ocean Acidification Workshop in a NOAA Technical Memorandum (OAR-OAP-3). Over 70 scientists, managers and stakeholders met August 11-13, 2020 to identify needs and priorities to advance research on ocean acidification (OA) and harmful algal blooms (HABs) as co-stressors in coastal ecosystems.
Monday, August 9, 2021
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British Columbia to southern California: making headway with ocean change

NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory

On June 13, scientists aboard the NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown set out on the West Coast Ocean Acidification Research Cruise to characterize conditions along the West Coast of North America and continue to build a unique time-series of carbon and hydrographic measurements in areas expected to be highly impacted by ocean acidification. 
Wednesday, July 14, 2021
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10 years in the making: An inside look at NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Program with Director Libby Jewett

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

Libby Jewett, Ph.D., Director of the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program, provides insight into ocean acidification. Jewett highlights how she became involved in ocean acidification work, how NOAA's Ocean Acidification Program (OAP) started, and how we all can personally contribute to combatting this threat to our ocean.
Monday, June 7, 2021
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Scientists, scallop industry team up to study ocean acidification impacts

Scientists, scallop industry team up to study ocean acidification impacts

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

Guided by input from fishers, a team of scientists will bring together computer modeling and experiments to inform management policies for Northeast scallop fisheries facing the threat of ocean acidification.

Researchers from the University of Connecticut, NOAA’s Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC), Commercial Fisheries Research Foundation (CFRF), and Rutgers University will work together to study this economically and culturally significant resource for coastal communities in New England, with support from NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Program. Worth more than $500 million per year, scallops are the second most valuable fishery in the Northeast and are particularly vulnerable to ocean acidification.
Monday, January 25, 2021
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