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EasyDNNNews: Jobs and Opportunities

Oceanographer

Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center

The Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research (JIMAR) is currently recruiting an Oceanographer within the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, Ecosystem Sciences Division based in Honolulu, Hawaii.  As a part of a team of researchers in the Ecosystem Sciences Division, the Oceanographer will assess ecological impacts to the coral reef ecosystems in the U.S. Pacific Islands (Hawaii Archipelago, Marianas Archipelago, American Samoa, and the Pacific Remote Islands Areas) from multiple environmental drivers with a focus on local warming and changes in the coastal carbonate system. 

 Apply by May 24, 2019!

A full position description and more information about applying to this position can be found by navigating to www.rcuh.com and clicking on "Job Postings" and Project Name "JIMAR" (position 19214).

 

CLOSING DATE: May 24, 2019
 
A full position description and more information about applying to this position can be found by navigating to www.rcuh.com and clicking on "Job Postings" and Project Name "JIMAR" (position 19214).
Monday, May 13, 2019
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Undergraduate Research Internship Opportunities

Mook Sea Farm & SEANET

Two ocean acidification-related undergraduate research internship opportunities are avaiable this summer at Mook Sea Farm in Walpole, ME supported by SEANET.  These opportunities are open to undergraduate students from or attending university in Maine.

The Aquaculture in changing waters: Impacts of ocean acidification on juvenile oysters opportunity is directly related to ocean acidification and the aquaculture industry.  The second internship, Environmental influence on larval bivalve settlement success, will consider the effects of several environmental variables, including pCO2, pH, and saturation state, on larval bivalve settlement in a field study.

Applications will be reviewed beginning February 18. 2019. Please direct questions to me, Meredith White, meredith.megan.white@gmail.com.

Thursday, January 31, 2019
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2019 Request for Proposals

Washington Sea Grant

Washington Sea Grant (WSG) requests proposals for one- to-two-year projects from investigators at academic, research and education institutions throughout the state of Washington. Funded projects will contribute to WSG and state priority information needs by advancing knowledge in one of four focus areas: healthy coastal ecosystems; sustainable fisheries and aquaculture; resilient communities and economies; and ocean literacy and workforce development.
 
About $2 million will be awarded during the two-year funding cycle through a competitive review process.
 
Proposals must follow the guidelines detailed in the 2019 Request for Proposals and be submitted through eSeaGrant, WSG’s online proposal submission system. Note: eSeaGrant will open for investigators to start a preliminary proposal on January 28, 2019.

Wednesday, January 30, 2019
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Federal Funding Opportunity: Regional Ocean Acidification Observing Optimization Study

NOAA OCEAN ACIDIFICATION PROGRAM

The NOAA/OAR/Ocean Acidification Program (OAP) is soliciting proposals for studies investigating ocean acidification monitoring strategies that would offer an observing system design that best characterizes and tracks ocean acidification within U.S. Large Marine Ecosystems (LMEs) optimized towards characterizing the conditions most relevant to ecologically and economically important marine species.

Letters of intent due February 5th, 2019 (EXTENDED Deadline)

More info here:  https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html?keywords=11.017

 

 

Thursday, November 1, 2018
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Ocean acidification may reduce sea scallop fisheries

Ocean acidification may reduce sea scallop fisheries

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

A new model created by scientists at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution projects - under a worst- case scenario - that warming and increasingly acidic waters could reduce the sea scallop population by more than 50% in the next 30 to 80 years. The bright spot? Fisheries management and efforts to reduce CO2 emissions, might slow or even stop that trend for this $500 million fishery.


Thursday, October 4, 2018
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