NOAA research links human-caused CO2 emissions to dissolving sea snail shells off U.S. West Coast

NOAA research links human-caused CO2 emissions to dissolving sea snail shells off U.S. West Coast

NOAA

For the first time, NOAA and partner scientists have connected the concentration of human-caused carbon dioxide in waters off the U.S. Pacific coast to the dissolving of shells of microscopic marine sea snails called pteropods.

“This is the first time we’ve been able to tease out the percentage of human-caused carbon dioxide from natural carbon dioxide along a large portion of the West Coast and link it directly to pteropod shell dissolution,” said Richard Feely, a NOAA senior scientist who led the research appearing in Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science. “Our research shows that humans are increasing the acidification of U.S. West Coast coastal waters, making it more difficult for marine species to build strong shells.”

Wednesday, November 23, 2016

State of the science workshop

Alaska Ocean Acidification Network

The Alaska Ocean Acidification Network is hosting a 2-day workshop in Anchorage, inviting a broad audience across the state interested in ocean acidification issues. The aim of this workshop is to educate the broader Alaska community on the processes and consequences of OA, create connections between researchers and stakeholders, and develop new ideas and partnerships to enhance monitoring and community engagement. A report on the state of the science in Alaska will be produced after the workshop, as well as a set of recommendations to help guide the Alaska OA Network.

Day 1 will be conducted in plenary format and is intended to engage a broad audience including fishermen, shellfish growers, resource managers, researchers, coastal residents and anyone interested in ocean acidification. This first day will provide the basics on OA and an overview of research, monitoring, trends, forecasts and strategies for adaptation.  Day 2 will be more discussion-oriented and include breakout groups, a session for OA researchers, and a meeting of the Alaska OA Network steering committee.

Tuesday, November 8, 2016
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Abstract submission: Synthesizing Ocean Acidification Information- Moving from raising awareness to supporting actions

ASLO's 2017 Aquatic Sciences Meeting

NOAA's Ocean Acidification Program is planning a session for the ASLO 2017 Aquatic Sciences Meeting highlighting the transfer of ocean acidification knowledge from scientists to stakeholders. Registration and abstract submission are open for ASLO's 2017 Aquatic Sciences Meeting that will take place 26 February through 3 March 2017 in Honolulu, Hawaii, USA.  In order to have your abstract considered for acceptance, you must submit and register before the abstract deadline of Midnight, Central Daylight Time USA / 05:00 Greenwich Mean Time, on 14 October 2016. The abstract submission deadline will not be extended.  To begin the submission process, please go to https://www.sgmeet.com/aslo/honolulu2017/reginfo.asp to register.

Friday, October 7, 2016
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FEDERAL FUNDING OPPORTUNITY: Regional Vulnerability Assessments for Ocean Acidification

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

The Ocean Acidification Program is soliciting proposals for collaborative projects of up to 2 years in duration that synthesize ocean acidification information at a regional scale (e.g. Large Marine Ecosystem, large estuary or collection of small estuaries, and state or collection of states in US waters) to determine where societal vulnerabilities to ocean acidification exist or are emerging, in order to provide actionable information for marine resource decision makers. This funding opportunity will not support the collection of new chemical or ecological observations or species response data. Social science data collection is permitted.

More information on how to apply can be found on the Information for Applicants page. This grant is Funding Opportunity Number: NOAA-OAR-OAP-2017-2005016.  Email Letters of Intent to erica.h.ombres@noaa.gov. Full proposals should be submitted through grants.gov/

Important dates:  Letters of Intent are due November 4th and full proposals are due January 13th

Monday, September 26, 2016
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WESTPAC Scientists Step up Efforts to Combat Ocean Acidification

WESTPAC Scientists Step up Efforts to Combat Ocean Acidification

Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission for the Western Pacific (WESTPAC)

46 Scientists from the region gathered again in Phuket, Thailand, 29-31 August 2016, stepping up their efforts to develop a long term program monitoring the ecological impacts of ocean acidification on coral reef ecosystems for the region.

The three-day WESTPAC event is a follow-up to previous two workshops in 2015, with the aim to review and test, through expert discussions and practical demonstrations either in field or laboratory, a set of consistent, comparable and cost-effective “Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs)”, which could be used for monitoring the ecological impacts of ocean acidification on coral reef ecosystems. While these efforts are focused on the establishment of a regional ocean acidification observing network, we are ideally striving for consistency and comparability as part of the Global Ocean Acidification - Observing Network (GOA-ON).

Friday, September 16, 2016
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