DOI's Newswave highlights collaborative efforts in researching ocean acidification

Department of Interior

Department of Interior's Newswave highlights collaborative efforts in researching ocean acidification. The following stories can be found in the quarterly newsletter:

What is Ocean Acidification? -page 24

Coastal Acidification Networks: Regional Partnerships to Prepare the Nation-page 25

Understanding and Communicating Impacts of OA-page 26

Teamwork for Measuring OA-page 27

A link to the newsletter can be found Here

 

Tuesday, December 5, 2017
Categories: OA News
Oysters on acid: How the ocean's declining pH will change the way we eat

Oysters on acid: How the ocean's declining pH will change the way we eat

The New Food Economy

The ocean is changing faster than it has in the last 66 million years. Now, Oregon oysters are being farmed in Hawaii. That fix won’t work forever. 

A little more than ten years ago, a mysterious epidemic wiped out baby oyster populations. After two years of massive losses and no answers, scientists testing the waters discovered what was really wrong: the ocean water flowing into the hatcheries had changed, and the oysters weren’t able to build their shells. 

Check out the full article by H. Claire Brown, The New Food Economy, 28 November 2017.

Saturday, December 2, 2017
What scientists are learning about the impact of an acidifying ocean

What scientists are learning about the impact of an acidifying ocean

OA-ICC

The effects of ocean acidification on marine life have only become widely recognized in the past decade. Now researchers are rapidly expanding the scope of investigations into what falling pH means for ocean ecosystems.

Wednesday, October 4, 2017
Coral Reef Fish Are More Resilient Than We Thought, Study Finds

Coral Reef Fish Are More Resilient Than We Thought, Study Finds

NPR

At a time when the Great Barrier Reef and other coral reefs are facing unprecedented destruction, researchers in Australia have found a small ray of hope for the fish that make the reefs their home.

Fish are more resilient to the effects of ocean acidification than scientists had previously thought, according to research published Thursday in Scientific Reports.

Tuesday, September 5, 2017
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Keeping An Eye On Ocean Acidification In Chesapeake Bay

Keeping An Eye On Ocean Acidification In Chesapeake Bay

University of Delaware

 

New paper identifies pH minimum zone in bay water.

A research team, led by University of Delaware professor Wei-Jun Cai, has identified a zone of water that is increasing in acidity in the Chesapeake Bay.

The team analyzed little studied factors that play a role in ocean acidification (OA) — changes in water chemistry that threaten the ability of shellfish such as oysters, clams and scallops to create and maintain their shells, among other impacts.

 

Friday, September 1, 2017
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