Oceanographer

Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center

The Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research (JIMAR) is currently recruiting an Oceanographer within the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, Ecosystem Sciences Division based in Honolulu, Hawaii.  As a part of a team of researchers in the Ecosystem Sciences Division, the Oceanographer will assess ecological impacts to the coral reef ecosystems in the U.S. Pacific Islands (Hawaii Archipelago, Marianas Archipelago, American Samoa, and the Pacific Remote Islands Areas) from multiple environmental drivers with a focus on local warming and changes in the coastal carbonate system. 

 Apply by May 24, 2019!

A full position description and more information about applying to this position can be found by navigating to www.rcuh.com and clicking on "Job Postings" and Project Name "JIMAR" (position 19214).

 

CLOSING DATE: May 24, 2019
 
A full position description and more information about applying to this position can be found by navigating to www.rcuh.com and clicking on "Job Postings" and Project Name "JIMAR" (position 19214).
Monday, May 13, 2019
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Undergraduate Research Internship Opportunities

Mook Sea Farm & SEANET

Two ocean acidification-related undergraduate research internship opportunities are avaiable this summer at Mook Sea Farm in Walpole, ME supported by SEANET.  These opportunities are open to undergraduate students from or attending university in Maine.

The Aquaculture in changing waters: Impacts of ocean acidification on juvenile oysters opportunity is directly related to ocean acidification and the aquaculture industry.  The second internship, Environmental influence on larval bivalve settlement success, will consider the effects of several environmental variables, including pCO2, pH, and saturation state, on larval bivalve settlement in a field study.

Applications will be reviewed beginning February 18. 2019. Please direct questions to me, Meredith White, meredith.megan.white@gmail.com.

Thursday, January 31, 2019
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Ocean acidification may reduce sea scallop fisheries

Ocean acidification may reduce sea scallop fisheries

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

A new model created by scientists at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution projects - under a worst- case scenario - that warming and increasingly acidic waters could reduce the sea scallop population by more than 50% in the next 30 to 80 years. The bright spot? Fisheries management and efforts to reduce CO2 emissions, might slow or even stop that trend for this $500 million fishery.


Thursday, October 4, 2018
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Can meadows of underwater eelgrass help mitigate the harmful effects of Ocean Acidification on Eastern oysters?

Emily Rivest, Virginia Institute of Marine Science

Submerged Aquatic Vegetation (SAV), such as eelgrass, could mitigate the harmful impacts of ocean acidification on Eastern oysters by reducing the acidity of waters where oysters grow. These underwater grasses take up carbon dioxide and release oxygen into coastal waters, reducing the exposure of marine organisms to increases in acidity conditions that slow or stop oyster growth and reproduction. Oysters, in turn, improve water clarity forseagrasses to thrive by filtering particles out of the water and allowing more sunlight to penetrate. This modeling project will identify the threshold of acidification beyond which the economically important Eastern oyster is negatively impacted and will evaluate the potential benefit of seagrasses in protecting oysters and the ecosystem services they provide. The modeling tool will also identify the acidification conditions in which seagrass restoration is most helpful and when the economic benefits of this restoration to Easter oyster production outweigh the costs. At the end of this project, the final model will be freely available as an online tool and will help scientists, managers and oyster growers assess the potential for both seagrass and oyster restoration.
Tuesday, October 2, 2018

Research to inform adaptation decisions for Alaska’s Salmon Fisheries

David Finnoff, University of Wyoming

Alaska is expected to experience ocean acidification faster than any other United States coastal waters, primarily due to its colder water which absorbs more carbon dioxide than warmer waters. With seafood industry job incomes over $1.5 billion annually and a communities that rely on healthy oceans for subsistence, nutrition, and culture, increased ocean acidification is expected to have significant implications. Research on the potential impact to salmon has emerged as one of the top priorities, identified during a 2016 statewide workshop and stakeholder survey. Despite the economic importance of salmon, little research has been done on the effects of ocean acidification on salmon and the fishing industry and communities that depends on salmon. Acidification has been shown to impair coho salmon’s ability to smell and detect their prey. It has also been shown to reduce pink salmon growth rates. In addition, future ocean acidification is expected to affect salmon prey species, which is expected to affect Pacific salmon survival, abundance and productivity. This project will investigate the implication of ocean acidification thresholds and major ecosystem shifts in the Gulf of Alaska on salmon. Integrated human-ecological models will be developed to simulate management scenarios to assess the benefits of pre-emptive adaptation planning and policy making. The information from modeling these scenarios will help create decision tools for salmon managers.
Tuesday, October 2, 2018
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