Collaborating with community science groups for coastal acidification monitoring

Collaborating with community science groups for coastal acidification monitoring

Wednesday, June 26th, 2019 2pm ET (11am PT)

In this webinar, Beth Turner of NOAA National Ocean Service, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, shares priorities and capacities of citizen science groups for acidification measurements in the Northeast US, reactions to the provided training, lessons gained and how we might engage in future coordinated monitoring efforts.

Monday, June 10, 2019
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New NOAA, partner buoy in American Samoa opens window into a changing ocean

New NOAA, partner buoy in American Samoa opens window into a changing ocean

NOAA Research

NOAA and partners have launched a new buoy in Fagatele Bay within NOAA’s National Marine Sanctuary of American Samoa to measure the amount of carbon dioxide in the waters around a vibrant tropical coral reef ecosystem.

“This new monitoring effort in a remote area of the Pacific Ocean will not only advance our understanding of changing ocean chemistry in this valuable and vibrant coral ecosystem but will also help us communicate these changes to diverse stakeholders in the Pacific Islands and across the United States,” said Derek Manzello, coral ecologist with NOAA’s Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory.


Thursday, May 23, 2019

Federal Funding Opportunity: Regional Ocean Acidification Observing Optimization Study

NOAA OCEAN ACIDIFICATION PROGRAM

The NOAA/OAR/Ocean Acidification Program (OAP) is soliciting proposals for studies investigating ocean acidification monitoring strategies that would offer an observing system design that best characterizes and tracks ocean acidification within U.S. Large Marine Ecosystems (LMEs) optimized towards characterizing the conditions most relevant to ecologically and economically important marine species.

Letters of intent due February 5th, 2019 (EXTENDED Deadline)

More info here:  https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html?keywords=11.017

 

 

Thursday, November 1, 2018
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How sensitive are systems in the Chesapeake Bay to acidification and nutrient pollution?

Jeremy Testa, University of Maryland

The wild oyster industry has suffered repeated collapses in the Chesapeake Bay due to overharvesting, disease, and declining environmental conditions. How future conditions will affect the Eastern oyster remain uncertain, not only because these conditions such as increased freshwater are difficult to predict , but also because the interactions between stressors such as ocean acidification, temperature, nutrient runoff and sea level rise could lead to unexpected chemical, biological, and economic change. The changes in stressors and their impacts do not always proceed in a straight line.The potential responses of various life stages of the Eastern oyster to stressors like acidification and eutrophication has received little attention. This project will study the impact of different stressors to Chesapeake Bay, a large estuarine system, and the Eastern oyster. The study will bring together different models to understand the relationship between biogeochemical cycling of carbon, oxygen, and nutrients, oyster growth and survival, and oyster economic profitability in the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. The project will provide insights into future conditions and habitats where aquaculture and wild oyster populations may be most vulnerable to the climate and ocean changes.
Tuesday, October 2, 2018

NOAA RESTORE Funding Competition on Long Term Trends

NOAA RESTORE Science Program

The priority for this competition is identifying, tracking, understanding, and/or predicting trends and variability in the Gulf of Mexico’s living coastal and marine resources and the processes driving them.

Applicants must propose work that addresses this priority in one or more of these areas of emphasis: 1) exploring trends in multiple species, 2) investigating the link between weather and/or climate and trends, and 3) examining the relationship between trends and economic activity.

To receive funding, applicants will need to directly address the needs of resource managers and have a clear plan for how their research findings or products will be used by resource managers. Applicants are encouraged to include resource managers on their project teams.

This competition is the Science Program’s first dedicated to supporting integrated, long-term projects. Pre-proposals, which are required, are due by July 30, 2018and the deadline for submitting a full application is October 29, 2018. Please see the full announcement for complete instructions on how to submit a pre-proposal and full application. 

Wednesday, June 6, 2018
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