Federal Funding Opportunity: Regional Ocean Acidification Observing Optimization Study

NOAA OCEAN ACIDIFICATION PROGRAM

The NOAA/OAR/Ocean Acidification Program (OAP) is soliciting proposals for studies investigating ocean acidification monitoring strategies that would offer an observing system design that best characterizes and tracks ocean acidification within U.S. Large Marine Ecosystems (LMEs) optimized towards characterizing the conditions most relevant to ecologically and economically important marine species.

Letters of intent due January 7th, 2019.

More info here:  https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html?keywords=11.017

 

 

Thursday, November 1, 2018
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$3.5 Million Awarded to Identify Acidification Thresholds in Coastal Ecosystems

$3.5 Million Awarded to Identify Acidification Thresholds in Coastal Ecosystems

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) and Ocean Acidification Program (OAP) have jointly funded four projects totaling $3.5 million to identify the threshold at which ecosystems change rapidly and their services are irreversibly altered. From the Chesapeake Bay to the coastal waters of Alaska, this work will help managers reduce stressors to avoid the decline or potential collapse of valuable marine ecosystems.


Tuesday, September 25, 2018
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Piecing together the ocean acidification puzzle along the US West Coast

Piecing together the ocean acidification puzzle along the US West Coast

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

Emma Hodgson, a Liber Ero Postdoctoral Fellow at Simon Fraser University, and her colleagues are making big strides in piecing together the ocean acidification puzzle along the US west coast for those that make decisions around this ocean change. As part of her doctoral research at the University of Washington, Hodgson worked with a team to design modeling tools that create a better picture of ocean acidification impacts on fisheries catches, economies, and communities in this US region.
Tuesday, September 11, 2018
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To protect marine life, NOAA monitoring seasonal and yearly changes in surface water pH in Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico

To protect marine life, NOAA monitoring seasonal and yearly changes in surface water pH in Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico

NOAA Climate Program Office

Since atmospheric carbon dioxide emissions began to increase after the Industrial Revolution, the acidity of the ocean’s surface waters has increased by 30%. This rising acidity—reflected in falling pH levels—harms shell-building creatures and other marine life. As part of their effort to protect our oceans and the communities that depend on them, NOAA scientists have developed a way to visualize and monitor monthly and yearly changes in surface water pH in the Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico.
Tuesday, August 21, 2018
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From space to the sea floor: a deeper look at ocean acidification along the East Coast

From space to the sea floor: a deeper look at ocean acidification along the East Coast

NOAA OCEAN ACIDIFICATION PROGRAM

What if satellites circling our blue planet from space could offer insight into how an invisible gas like carbon dioxide moves through coastal waters, hundreds of miles above the ocean’s surface? Scientists will be working to make this a reality as they travel from Nova Scotia to Florida on board NOAA ship Henry B. Bigelow to understand what is driving changes in our ocean’s chemistry.
Tuesday, June 26, 2018
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