Strengthening the net: Ocean acidification observations in California

Strengthening the net: Ocean acidification observations in California

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

A foggy morning on the central California coastline is a picturesque scene of rolling waves, screeching gulls, and fishermen hauling hefty nets teeming with fish. If you look closely at the net you observe that it is a framework of lines working together to capture a greater amount of fish than a single fishing line could capture alone. In the same way, ocean observing systems can be thought of as a net to capture what is happening with our ocean’s chemistry. But a net with gaps or holes is not very efficient, whether it be in fishing or in observing. A newly funded project by Dr. Chris Edwards, a Professor at the University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC), along with collaborators at UCSC and the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) is taking a look at where ‘holes’ in our observing system are. The team will identify ways to fill those gaps in order to capture changing ocean chemistry along the California coast.
Tuesday, October 8, 2019
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Ocean acidification may reduce sea scallop fisheries

Ocean acidification may reduce sea scallop fisheries

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

A new model created by scientists at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution projects - under a worst- case scenario - that warming and increasingly acidic waters could reduce the sea scallop population by more than 50% in the next 30 to 80 years. The bright spot? Fisheries management and efforts to reduce CO2 emissions, might slow or even stop that trend for this $500 million fishery.


Thursday, October 4, 2018
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Piecing together the ocean acidification puzzle along the US West Coast

Piecing together the ocean acidification puzzle along the US West Coast

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

Emma Hodgson, a Liber Ero Postdoctoral Fellow at Simon Fraser University, and her colleagues are making big strides in piecing together the ocean acidification puzzle along the US west coast for those that make decisions around this ocean change. As part of her doctoral research at the University of Washington, Hodgson worked with a team to design modeling tools that create a better picture of ocean acidification impacts on fisheries catches, economies, and communities in this US region.
Tuesday, September 11, 2018
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To protect marine life, NOAA monitoring seasonal and yearly changes in surface water pH in Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico

To protect marine life, NOAA monitoring seasonal and yearly changes in surface water pH in Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico

NOAA Climate Program Office

Since atmospheric carbon dioxide emissions began to increase after the Industrial Revolution, the acidity of the ocean’s surface waters has increased by 30%. This rising acidity—reflected in falling pH levels—harms shell-building creatures and other marine life. As part of their effort to protect our oceans and the communities that depend on them, NOAA scientists have developed a way to visualize and monitor monthly and yearly changes in surface water pH in the Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico.
Tuesday, August 21, 2018
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Old Bay with a new spice: a new buoy helps monitor how carbon dioxide is changing the Chesapeake Bay

Old Bay with a new spice: a new buoy helps monitor how carbon dioxide is changing the Chesapeake Bay

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

A new Ocean Acidification monitoring buoy was deployed on April 5, 2018 in the largest United States estuary, the Chesapeake Bay. This is the first long-term ocean acidification monitoring buoy and it will be deployed at the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay. The buoy will measure carbon parameters in the estuary, which is particularly vulnerable to changes in carbonate chemistry. These changes could impact economically valuable resources for Bay communities, such as oysters. The data from this buoy will supply models with the information needed to recognize potential areas of vulnerability and what future chemical parameters may look like in the bay, while also expanding the National Ocean Acidification Observing Network. It will also help researchers at NOAA PMEL, University of Delaware and University of Maryland differentiate between human-caused and natural variations in carbonate chemistry in the estuary.


Friday, April 6, 2018
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