Gliding into the Future of Ocean Acidification Observing

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

The technology used to observe ocean acidification - the shift in ocean chemistry driven by an increase in the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere due to the burning of fossil fuels and other human activities - has followed the same trend of innovation and scaling as computer technology. Measuring ocean chemistry traditionally involves a team of scientists to collect samples at sea and an entire lab team to analytically determine the carbonate chemistry by measuring multiple parameters, including pH. While these methods are still being used, innovations in technology have made continuous pH sampling in our ocean possible. Dr. Grace Saba, an assistant professor at Rutgers University, has worked to develop a new sensor and is leading a project that will combine this new technology, existing data, and modeling to optimize the ocean acidification observing network in the Northeast US.
Wednesday, January 29, 2020
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Marine Shellfish Populations Estimated to be at Risk from Ocean Acidification

Marine Shellfish Populations Estimated to be at Risk from Ocean Acidification

NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Sciences

The absorption of rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) into the oceans has caused ocean acidification and associated shifts in marine carbonate chemistry. In coastal waters, excessive nutrient runoff can also create regions of low oxygen, high CO2, and acidification. These conditions have been shown to be detrimental to growth and survival of larval and juvenile shellfish such as oysters, clams and scallops in laboratory studies, but the consequences of these effects on wild populations have been unknown.

Now, a new publication shows that the levels of impairment observed in laboratory experiments have the potential to cause increased risk to wild populations of marine bivalves in the northeastern USA.

Monday, January 27, 2020
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Letters of Intent Due January 24th, 2020

FEDERAL FUNDING OPPORTUNITY: Regional Vulnerability Assessments for Ocean Acidification

The Ocean Acidification Program is soliciting proposals for collaborative projects of up to 3 years in duration that synthesize ocean acidification information at a regional scale (e.g. Large Marine Ecosystem, large estuary or collection of small estuaries, and state or collection of states in US waters) to determine where societal vulnerabilities to ocean acidification exist or are emerging, in order to provide actionable information for marine resource decision makers. This funding opportunity will not support the collection of new chemical or ecological observations or species response data. Social science data collection is permitted.

Information about this opportunity can be found here:https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html?keywords=11.017 This grant is Funding Opportunity Number: NOAA-OAR-OAP-2020-2006333.  Email Letters of Intent to erica.h.ombres@noaa.gov. Full proposals should be submitted through grants.gov

Important dates:  Letters of Intent are due January 24th and full proposals are due March 27th. 

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Monday, November 25, 2019
Strengthening the net: Ocean acidification observations in California

Strengthening the net: Ocean acidification observations in California

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

A foggy morning on the central California coastline is a picturesque scene of rolling waves, screeching gulls, and fishermen hauling hefty nets teeming with fish. If you look closely at the net you observe that it is a framework of lines working together to capture a greater amount of fish than a single fishing line could capture alone. In the same way, ocean observing systems can be thought of as a net to capture what is happening with our ocean’s chemistry. But a net with gaps or holes is not very efficient, whether it be in fishing or in observing. A newly funded project by Dr. Chris Edwards, a Professor at the University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC), along with collaborators at UCSC and the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) is taking a look at where ‘holes’ in our observing system are. The team will identify ways to fill those gaps in order to capture changing ocean chemistry along the California coast.
Tuesday, October 8, 2019
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Ocean acidification may reduce sea scallop fisheries

Ocean acidification may reduce sea scallop fisheries

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

A new model created by scientists at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution projects - under a worst- case scenario - that warming and increasingly acidic waters could reduce the sea scallop population by more than 50% in the next 30 to 80 years. The bright spot? Fisheries management and efforts to reduce CO2 emissions, might slow or even stop that trend for this $500 million fishery.


Thursday, October 4, 2018
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