Assessing Vulnerability to a Changing Ocean: Investigating impact and option for adaptation

Assessing Vulnerability to a Changing Ocean: Investigating impact and option for adaptation

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

In certain areas of the US, marine resources and the communities that depend on them are particularly vulnerable to the impacts of ocean and coastal acidification along with other ocean changes. The NOAA Ocean Acidification Program recently awarded funding for three regional vulnerability assessment projects in the Chesapeake Bay, Northeast US and US West Coast. The projects bring together oceanographic, fisheries and aquaculture data and social science to assess vulnerability of dependent communities and industries, anticipate challenges they may face, and explore adaptations options.
Monday, December 21, 2020

Assessing vulnerability of the Atlantic Sea Scallop social-ecological system in the northeast waters of the US

Samantha Seidlecki (University of Connecticut), Lisa Colburn (NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center), Shannon Meseck (NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center)

Of the fisheries made up of calcifiers in the Northeast United States, the Atlantic sea scallop fishery is worth more than $500 million per year, is the second highest fisheries revenue in the United States, and the largest wild scallop fishery in the world. The vulnerability and resilience of fishing communities to the effects of warming and Ocean Acidification (OA) on Northeast species is dependent on their adaptive capacity in relation to both social and environmental exposure and sensitivity factors. Communities that harvest a diversity of species may adapt more easily than communities that specialize in one or a few species. The regional contribution of sea scallop to total regional landed value has steadily increased over recent decades as has fishing community dependence on it as a source of revenue. Prior work projecting impacts to scallops in the region found that sea scallop biomass may decline by more than 50% by the end of the century with a large impact on the fishery (Cooley et al. 2015; Rheuban et al. 2018), but new tools and lab results are available for this proposed work that may alter this assessment. The team is working the hypothesis that a spatially- explicit regional projection of changes relative to sea scallop fishing zones can inform fishery management and allow communities that rely on Atlantic sea scallops to plan and become more resilient to future change. This work will develop a recommendation to management to assist scallop industry stakeholders and managers with changes in the fishery that result from projected OA and temperature changes. 
Monday, December 21, 2020
Stone Crab Fishery Could be Challenged by Ocean Acidification, Study Suggest

Stone Crab Fishery Could be Challenged by Ocean Acidification, Study Suggest

Mote Marine Laboratory

The first study on Florida stone crabs and ocean acidification was published this month by a Mote Marine Laboratory scientist and offers clues for relieving environmental stress on these tasty and economically valuable crabs.
Saturday, March 31, 2018
New Video on Ocean Acidification: Salmon and the Puget Sound

New Video on Ocean Acidification: Salmon and the Puget Sound

Tiffany Grunzel, University of Washington Communications Leadership Program

Ocean acidification could have deep impacts for salmon in the Puget Sound. 

Tiffany Grunzel from the University of Washington Communications Leadership program, interviews Dr. Shallin Busch (NOAA), Dr. Chase Williams (UW), and Robert Purser Jr. (Susquamish Fisheries) about the direct and indirect impacts of ocean acidification on salmon and what this could mean for tribal culture and the seafood industry.

A link to the video can be found [EasyDNNnewsLink|79]

Saturday, December 16, 2017
Categories: OA News
Mukilteo scientist tries to discover why C02 is hurting oceans

Mukilteo scientist tries to discover why C02 is hurting oceans

HeraldNet

Shallin Busch is a Mukilteo-based ecologist whose research is linking ocean acidification to the deteriorating health of the Puget Sound ecosystem. The Mukilteo team has looked at or is looking at ocean acidification effects on krill, salmon, Dungeness crab, black cod and pteropod (marine snails). So far it has found that lower pH levels lead to lower survival and slower development rates, as well as changes in behavior. 
Wednesday, October 11, 2017
RSS
12