NOAA RESTORE Funding Competition on Long Term Trends

NOAA RESTORE Science Program

The priority for this competition is identifying, tracking, understanding, and/or predicting trends and variability in the Gulf of Mexico’s living coastal and marine resources and the processes driving them.

Applicants must propose work that addresses this priority in one or more of these areas of emphasis: 1) exploring trends in multiple species, 2) investigating the link between weather and/or climate and trends, and 3) examining the relationship between trends and economic activity.

To receive funding, applicants will need to directly address the needs of resource managers and have a clear plan for how their research findings or products will be used by resource managers. Applicants are encouraged to include resource managers on their project teams.

This competition is the Science Program’s first dedicated to supporting integrated, long-term projects. Pre-proposals, which are required, are due by July 30, 2018and the deadline for submitting a full application is October 29, 2018. Please see the full announcement for complete instructions on how to submit a pre-proposal and full application. 

Wednesday, June 6, 2018
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Stone Crab Fishery Could be Challenged by Ocean Acidification, Study Suggest

Stone Crab Fishery Could be Challenged by Ocean Acidification, Study Suggest

Mote Marine Laboratory

The first study on Florida stone crabs and ocean acidification was published this month by a Mote Marine Laboratory scientist and offers clues for relieving environmental stress on these tasty and economically valuable crabs.
Saturday, March 31, 2018

Scientists pinpoint how ocean acidification weakens coral skeletons

National Science Foundation, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Corals grow their skeletons upward toward sunlight, thickening and reinforcing them. The new research, led by National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded scientists at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), shows that ocean acidification impedes the thickening process -- decreasing the skeletons' density and leaving them more vulnerable to breaking. The results were published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Learn more here

Tuesday, January 30, 2018
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Researching the Impact of Ocean Acidification on Atlantic Silversides

Researching the Impact of Ocean Acidification on Atlantic Silversides

Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Scientists and NOAA Hollings scholars at the Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC) are studying how Atlantic silverside, one of the most common fishes on the Atlantic Coast and an important diet component of many larger fishes of this region, are impacted by changes in ocean acidification (increased CO2, lower pH), increased temperature, and lower dissolved oxygen projected to occur in the future. The team is exposing silverside embryos and larvae to these three stressors and monitoring effects on survival, hatching time, and size of the fish larvae at hatching and later in life. In addition, they are mimicking day-night cycles in CO2 by oscillating the CO2 levels every 12 hours and assessing how the magnitude of these fluctuations impact young silverside. This will help scientists better predict how future ocean conditions could alter this important food source.

Pictures: 1. 2017 Hollings Scholar Amy Zyck monitoring young Atlantic silverside in the CO2 and dissolved oxygen experiment at the NOAA Sandy Hook Laboratory.


Wednesday, January 24, 2018
Ocean Acidification means major changes for California mussels

Ocean Acidification means major changes for California mussels

Florida State University News

For thousands of years, California mussel shells have shared a relatively uniform mineralogical makeup — long, cylindrical calcite crystals ordered in neat vertical rows with crisp, geometric regularity. But in a study published this week in the journal Global Change BiologyMcCoy and her team suggest that escalating rates of ocean acidification are shaking up that shell mineralogy on its most basic structural levels. “What we’ve seen in more recent shells is that the crystals are small and disoriented,” said Assistant Professor of Biological Science Sophie McCoy, who led the study. “These are significant changes in how these animals produce their shells that can be tied to a shifting ocean chemistry.” “When the mussels are ready to build their shells, they first lay down an amorphous soup of calcium carbonate, which they later order and organize,” McCoy said. “More recent shells have just started heaping that calcium carbonate soup where it needs to go and then leaving it there disordered.” The team also found that recent shells exhibited elevated levels of magnesium — a sign that the process of shell formation has been disrupted.

Find the full article here

Photo: Sophie McCoy.

Monday, January 8, 2018
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