Strengthening the net: Ocean acidification observations in California

Strengthening the net: Ocean acidification observations in California

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

A foggy morning on the central California coastline is a picturesque scene of rolling waves, screeching gulls, and fishermen hauling hefty nets teeming with fish. If you look closely at the net you observe that it is a framework of lines working together to capture a greater amount of fish than a single fishing line could capture alone. In the same way, ocean observing systems can be thought of as a net to capture what is happening with our ocean’s chemistry. But a net with gaps or holes is not very efficient, whether it be in fishing or in observing. A newly funded project by Dr. Chris Edwards, a Professor at the University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC), along with collaborators at UCSC and the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) is taking a look at where ‘holes’ in our observing system are. The team will identify ways to fill those gaps in order to capture changing ocean chemistry along the California coast.
Tuesday, October 8, 2019
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Optimizing Acidification Observations In A Changing Ocean

Optimizing Acidification Observations In A Changing Ocean

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

There are hundreds if not thousands of eyes on our changing ocean at any moment: Buoys, gliders, saildrones and ships measure carbonate chemistry and new ocean observing technologies are continually being created to monitor ocean acidification. As science and technology progress it is important to ensure that the most up to date knowledge is applied to the task at hand. NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Program (OAP) is teaming up with the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS®) to fund four projects aimed at improving the observing system design for characterizing ocean acidification. This work will evaluate the capability of existing observations to characterize the magnitude and extent of acidification and explore alternative regional ocean acidification observing approaches. Ultimately this work will minimize errors in measurements, better integrate existing observations, and minimize costs of monitoring ocean acidification.

Learn more about this exciting work here!

Tuesday, September 10, 2019
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Collaborating with community science groups for coastal acidification monitoring

Collaborating with community science groups for coastal acidification monitoring

Wednesday, June 26th, 2019 2pm ET (11am PT)

In this webinar, Beth Turner of NOAA National Ocean Service, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, shares priorities and capacities of citizen science groups for acidification measurements in the Northeast US, reactions to the provided training, lessons gained and how we might engage in future coordinated monitoring efforts.

Monday, June 10, 2019
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New NOAA, partner buoy in American Samoa opens window into a changing ocean

New NOAA, partner buoy in American Samoa opens window into a changing ocean

NOAA Research

NOAA and partners have launched a new buoy in Fagatele Bay within NOAA’s National Marine Sanctuary of American Samoa to measure the amount of carbon dioxide in the waters around a vibrant tropical coral reef ecosystem.

“This new monitoring effort in a remote area of the Pacific Ocean will not only advance our understanding of changing ocean chemistry in this valuable and vibrant coral ecosystem but will also help us communicate these changes to diverse stakeholders in the Pacific Islands and across the United States,” said Derek Manzello, coral ecologist with NOAA’s Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory.


Thursday, May 23, 2019

Oceanographer

Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center

The Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research (JIMAR) is currently recruiting an Oceanographer within the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, Ecosystem Sciences Division based in Honolulu, Hawaii.  As a part of a team of researchers in the Ecosystem Sciences Division, the Oceanographer will assess ecological impacts to the coral reef ecosystems in the U.S. Pacific Islands (Hawaii Archipelago, Marianas Archipelago, American Samoa, and the Pacific Remote Islands Areas) from multiple environmental drivers with a focus on local warming and changes in the coastal carbonate system. 

 Apply by May 24, 2019!

A full position description and more information about applying to this position can be found by navigating to www.rcuh.com and clicking on "Job Postings" and Project Name "JIMAR" (position 19214).

 

CLOSING DATE: May 24, 2019
 
A full position description and more information about applying to this position can be found by navigating to www.rcuh.com and clicking on "Job Postings" and Project Name "JIMAR" (position 19214).
Monday, May 13, 2019
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