Old Bay with a new spice: a new buoy helps monitor how carbon dioxide is changing the Chesapeake Bay

Old Bay with a new spice: a new buoy helps monitor how carbon dioxide is changing the Chesapeake Bay

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

A new Ocean Acidification monitoring buoy was deployed on April 5, 2018 in the largest United States estuary, the Chesapeake Bay. This is the first long-term ocean acidification monitoring buoy and it will be deployed at the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay. The buoy will measure carbon parameters in the estuary, which is particularly vulnerable to changes in carbonate chemistry. These changes could impact economically valuable resources for Bay communities, such as oysters. The data from this buoy will supply models with the information needed to recognize potential areas of vulnerability and what future chemical parameters may look like in the bay, while also expanding the National Ocean Acidification Observing Network. It will also help researchers at NOAA PMEL, University of Delaware and University of Maryland differentiate between human-caused and natural variations in carbonate chemistry in the estuary.


Friday, April 6, 2018
NEW online community catalyzing response to #oceanacidification through collaboration and information sharing

NEW online community catalyzing response to #oceanacidification through collaboration and information sharing

Ocean Acidification Information Exchange

 A virtual space to:

Engage with regional and topical teams
Address challenges with others in your field
Share resources and information on ocean acidification
Facilitate interdisciplinary collaboration
Follow the latest conferences, workshop, and webinars

Saturday, March 31, 2018
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Assess, anticipate, adapt: Vulnerability and Responses to Ocean Acidification

Assess, anticipate, adapt: Vulnerability and Responses to Ocean Acidification

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

There are areas in the United States where marine resources and the communities and industries that depend on them are particularly vulnerable to the impacts of ocean acidification. In three US regions, our understanding of vulnerability is being advanced by coupling ocean and social science data to equip communities and industries with the information needed to evaluate, anticipate, and adapt to ocean acidification.
Thursday, March 15, 2018
Latest Science Updates to the 2012 WA State Blue Ribbon Panel Report

Latest Science Updates to the 2012 WA State Blue Ribbon Panel Report

Marine Resources Advisory Council

The Washington state governor’s appointed board, the Marine Resources Advisory Council, released its first update in five years to the state’s coordinated response to ocean acidification. In the five years since the Blue Ribbon Panel’s report, there have been significant scientific advances and progress made on the 42 recommended actions. The report highlights the new research that justifies more concerted efforts to combat ocean acidification. The report is publicly available here

Eleven NOAA and Washington Sea Grant scientists from the National Ocean Service, National Marine Fisheries Service and the Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research served on the Blue Ribbon “Refresh” Panel and contributed to the report.

Photo Credit: NW Straits Commission

Wednesday, December 20, 2017

DOI's Newswave highlights collaborative efforts in researching ocean acidification

Department of Interior

Department of Interior's Newswave highlights collaborative efforts in researching ocean acidification. The following stories can be found in the quarterly newsletter:

What is Ocean Acidification? -page 24

Coastal Acidification Networks: Regional Partnerships to Prepare the Nation-page 25

Understanding and Communicating Impacts of OA-page 26

Teamwork for Measuring OA-page 27

A link to the newsletter can be found Here

 

Tuesday, December 5, 2017
Categories: FeaturedOA News
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