Optimizing Ocean Acidification Observations for Model Parameterization in the Coupled Slope Water System of the U.S. Northeast Large Marine Ecosystem

Grace Saba, Rutgers University

The U.S. Northeast Shelf Large Marine Ecosystem, supports some of the nation’s most economically valuable coastal fisheries, yet most of this revenue comes from shellfish that are sensitive to ocean acidification (OA). Furthermore, the weakly buffered northern region of this area is expected to have greater susceptibility to OA. Existing OA observations in the NES do not sample at the time, space, and depth scales needed to capture the physical, biological, and chemical processes occurring in this dynamic coastal shelf region. Specific to inorganic carbon and OA, the data available in the region has not been leveraged to conduct a comprehensive regional-scale analysis that would increase the ability to understand and model seasonal-scale, spatial-scale, and subsurface carbonate chemistry dynamics, variability, and drivers in the NES. This project optimizes the NES OA observation network encompassing the Mid-Atlantic and Gulf of Maine regions by adding seasonal deployments of underwater gliders equipped with transformative, newly developed and tested deep ISFET-based pH sensors and additional sensors (measuring temperature, salinity for total alkalinity and aragonite saturation [ΩArag] estimation, oxygen, and chlorophyll), optimizing existing regional sampling to enhance carbonate chemistry measurements in several key locations, and compiling and integrating existing OA assets. The researchers will apply these data to an existing NES ocean ecosystem/biogeochemical (BGC) model that resolves carbonate chemistry and its variability. 


Tuesday, March 3, 2020

2020 Ocean Acidification Education Minigrant Program Funding Opportunity Now Open

Applications due April 3rd, 2020

The Ocean Acidification Program announces is now accepting applications for its 2020 education mini-grant initiative.Topics suitable under this Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO) should fill needs identified in the NOAA Ocean Acidification Needs Assessment including: 

(1) Education and outreach products that incorporate data interpretation and/or visualization;

(2) Multimedia educational tools (such as video, infographics and apps); 

(3) Discrete hands-on lab modules that incorporate inquiry-based learning and align with Next Generation Science and/or Common Core Standards to be used in a formal education setting; and/or 

(4) Protocol or tools for ocean and/or coastal acidification citizen science programs.

Pending appropriation of funds, NOAA Ocean Acidification Program anticipates awarding between four and five education and outreach projects totaling $150,000 dollars in FY2020. Projects must have amaximum duration of two years.

Questions about the content of your submission can be directed to jennifer.mintz@noaa.gov

For information regarding your grant submission contact emily.osborne@noaa.gov.

Formal Notice of Funding Opportunity on grants.gov

Thursday, February 6, 2020
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Postdoctoral Researcher in Marine Ecology

Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences

Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences is seeking a postdoctoral marine ecologist interested in applying research on determining the phytoremediation potential by farmed macroalgae species. Our aim is to identify the conditions under which co-cultivation of blue mussels and farmed kelp is mutually beneficial and can mitigate stresses from coastal acidification. This position is initially funded for 1 year and will offer opportunities for multi-institution and transdisciplinary collaboration, pursuit of independent funding, and training in molecular-based approaches to determine fate of kelp detritus if desired.

Please submit a cover letter and CV using Bigelow's online application portal. Screening of candidates will begin February 24, 2020 with expectation candidate will be available in April of 2020.

Monday, February 3, 2020
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Gliding into the Future of Ocean Acidification Observing

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

The technology used to observe ocean acidification - the shift in ocean chemistry driven by an increase in the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere due to the burning of fossil fuels and other human activities - has followed the same trend of innovation and scaling as computer technology. Measuring ocean chemistry traditionally involves a team of scientists to collect samples at sea and an entire lab team to analytically determine the carbonate chemistry by measuring multiple parameters, including pH. While these methods are still being used, innovations in technology have made continuous pH sampling in our ocean possible. Dr. Grace Saba, an assistant professor at Rutgers University, has worked to develop a new sensor and is leading a project that will combine this new technology, existing data, and modeling to optimize the ocean acidification observing network in the Northeast US.
Wednesday, January 29, 2020
Categories: OA News
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Marine Shellfish Populations Estimated to be at Risk from Ocean Acidification

Marine Shellfish Populations Estimated to be at Risk from Ocean Acidification

NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Sciences

The absorption of rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) into the oceans has caused ocean acidification and associated shifts in marine carbonate chemistry. In coastal waters, excessive nutrient runoff can also create regions of low oxygen, high CO2, and acidification. These conditions have been shown to be detrimental to growth and survival of larval and juvenile shellfish such as oysters, clams and scallops in laboratory studies, but the consequences of these effects on wild populations have been unknown.

Now, a new publication shows that the levels of impairment observed in laboratory experiments have the potential to cause increased risk to wild populations of marine bivalves in the northeastern USA.

Monday, January 27, 2020
Categories: OA News
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