NOAA and Partners Launch Research Cruise of East Coast to Study Ocean Acidification

NOAA and Partners Launch Research Cruise of East Coast to Study Ocean Acidification

By: NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

NOAA and scientists from PrincetonOld Dominion University, and the Universities of New HampshireDelaware, and Miami set off on June 19th from Newport, Rhode Island aboard NOAA ship Gordon Gunter on a research cruise to better understand ocean acidification and its drivers along the U.S. East Coast. 

This research cruise is just one part of a larger effort supported by the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program to better understand how ocean chemistry along all the U.S. coasts is changing in response to ocean acidification and where marine organisms may be at greatest risk. Similar cruises have taken place on the U.S. West Coast and the Gulf of Mexico. Understanding why and how fast our ocean chemistry is changing in different areas will allow scientists to better predict future changes and explore ways to adapt to those shifts.

Monday, June 22, 2015
Research identifies hot spots for addressing ocean acidification risks to US shellfisheries

Research identifies hot spots for addressing ocean acidification risks to US shellfisheries

NOAA scientist explains value of first nationwide shellfish risk assessment for adaptation and resilience planning

We caught up with Dwight Gledhill, deputy director of NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Program, and one of the 17 authors of a perspective published today in Nature Climate Change on vulnerability of U.S. shellfisheries to ocean acidification.

Ruben van Hooidonk of NOAA’s Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, and Peter E.T. Edwards of NOAA’s Coral Reef Conservation Program, also contributed to the perspective. The lead authors were Julia Ekstrom and Lisa Suatoni of the Natural Resources Defense Council.

Monday, February 23, 2015
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The Galápagos Islands: A Glimpse into the Future of Our Oceans

The Galápagos Islands: A Glimpse into the Future of Our Oceans

NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory

A study of Galápagos’ coral reefs provides evidence that reefs exposed to lower pH and higher nutrient levels may be the most affected and least resilient to changes in climate and ocean chemistry.
Thursday, January 22, 2015
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Turning the High Beams on Ocean Acidification: NOAA Funds Shellfish Farmers and Scientist To Expand Pacific Coast Monitoring With $1.4 Million Over Three Years

Turning the High Beams on Ocean Acidification: NOAA Funds Shellfish Farmers and Scientist To Expand Pacific Coast Monitoring With $1.4 Million Over Three Years

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

NOAA is providing a grant of $1.4 million over three years to help shellfish growers and scientific experts work together to expand ocean acidification (OA) monitoring in waters that are particularly important to Pacific coast communities such as in oyster hatcheries and coastal waters where young oysters are grown. 

Shellfish growers, hatchery owners and scientists will work together to strengthen their understanding of and ability to adapt to the impacts of ocean acidification on the Pacific Coast of the US, including Alaska. Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the burning of fossil fuels, which are being absorbed by the ocean, are causing a change in ocean chemistry which has already been detected along this coast. 

Monday, December 15, 2014
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Ocean Acidification Concerns, Information to be aired at Northeast Stakeholders Workshop

Ocean Acidification Concerns, Information to be aired at Northeast Stakeholders Workshop

The Northeast Coastal Acidification Network (NECAN) is hosting an “Ocean and Coastal Acidification Stakeholder Workshop” on December 10, 2014 at the Darling Marine Center in Walpole, Maine. The purpose is to inform and learn from fishermen, clam harvesters, aquaculturists, and coastal water quality volunteer programs their concerns and state of knowledge about ocean and coastal acidification (OCA). 

Thursday, December 4, 2014
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