Acidified ocean water widespread along North American West Coast

Acidified ocean water widespread along North American West Coast

Oregon State University

A three-year survey of the California Current System along the West Coast of the United States found persistent, highly acidified water throughout this ecologically critical nearshore habitat, with 'hotspots' of pH measurements as low as any oceanic surface waters in the world.

Wednesday, May 31, 2017
Pteropods as Indicators of Global Change: From Research to Education

Pteropods as Indicators of Global Change: From Research to Education

SOARCE Webinar

Presented by: Kevin Johnson, PhD Candidate, University of California, Santa Barbara

Primary audience: Informal educators and communicators

Date/Time: Tuesday, April 18th, 2017, 6:00pm ET

Wednesday, May 10, 2017
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Ocean Acidification Discussion

Ocean Acidification Discussion

Ocean Action Hub, United Nations

The discussion is taking place during the preparatory process for The Ocean Conference in order to engage stakeholders in assessing the challenges and opportunities related to delivering on implementation of SDG14.3 aimed at minimizing and addressing the impacts of ocean acidification. The discussion runs from 9 – 30 March 2017.  Dr. Libby Jewett, Director of NOAA's Ocean Acidification Program, is participating as a moderator. 

Thursday, March 9, 2017
New Tool Helps Oyster Growers Prepare for Changing Ocean Chemistry

New Tool Helps Oyster Growers Prepare for Changing Ocean Chemistry

NOAA Research, Laura Newcomb

For Bill Mook, coastal acidification is one thing his oyster hatchery cannot afford to ignore. Mook Sea Farm depends on seawater from the Gulf of Maine pumped into a Quonset hut-style building where tiny oysters are grown in tanks. Mook sells these tiny oysters to other oyster farmers or transfers them to his oyster farm on the Damariscotta River where they grow large enough to sell to restaurants and markets on the East Coast.

Thursday, January 26, 2017
NOAA research links human-caused CO2 emissions to dissolving sea snail shells off U.S. West Coast

NOAA research links human-caused CO2 emissions to dissolving sea snail shells off U.S. West Coast

NOAA

For the first time, NOAA and partner scientists have connected the concentration of human-caused carbon dioxide in waters off the U.S. Pacific coast to the dissolving of shells of microscopic marine sea snails called pteropods.

“This is the first time we’ve been able to tease out the percentage of human-caused carbon dioxide from natural carbon dioxide along a large portion of the West Coast and link it directly to pteropod shell dissolution,” said Richard Feely, a NOAA senior scientist who led the research appearing in Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science. “Our research shows that humans are increasing the acidification of U.S. West Coast coastal waters, making it more difficult for marine species to build strong shells.”

Wednesday, November 23, 2016
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