Federal Funding Opportunity: Regional Ocean Acidification Observing Optimization Study

NOAA OCEAN ACIDIFICATION PROGRAM

The NOAA/OAR/Ocean Acidification Program (OAP) is soliciting proposals for studies investigating ocean acidification monitoring strategies that would offer an observing system design that best characterizes and tracks ocean acidification within U.S. Large Marine Ecosystems (LMEs) optimized towards characterizing the conditions most relevant to ecologically and economically important marine species.

Letters of intent due February 5th, 2019 (EXTENDED Deadline)

More info here:  https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html?keywords=11.017

 

 

Thursday, November 1, 2018
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Mid-Scale Research Infrastructure Opportunities

National Science Foundation

Mid-Scale Research Infrastructure (Mid-scale RI) is an NSF-wide Big Idea designed to address the research community's growing needs for contemporary research infrastructure to support the advancement of science and engineering research, as well as science, technology, engineering and mathematics education research. Mid-scale RI will fund the implementation of experimental research capabilities in the mid-scale range (i.e., with a total project cost of between $20million and $70 million). The overall objective of Mid-scale RI is to transform scientific and engineering research fields by making available new capabilities, while simultaneously training researchers in the acquisition, implementation, development, design, and/or construction of cutting-edge infrastructure.

Mid-scale research infrastructure has been identified as critical for scientific advances in many research areas. In recognition of this scientific importance, the 2017 American Innovation and Competitiveness Act (AICA) directed NSF to "evaluate the existing and future needs, across all disciplines supported by the Foundation, for mid-scale projects" and to "develop a strategy to address the needs identified." NSF issued a Dear Colleague Letter (NSF 18-0131) and received responses whose execution would require $8 billion to $10 billion in funding for projects in the $20 million to $100 million range.

Letters of Intent are due February 8, 2019.

Thursday, October 18, 2018
Categories: Research Proposals
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Call for Applications: Innovation Lab: Learning the Power of Data in Chemistry

National Science Foundation

The National Science Foundation CHE: DCL invites chemists, chemical engineers, statisticians, applied mathematicians, and computer scientists to apply for the

NSF CHE/DMS Innovation Lab: Learning the Power of Data in Chemistry

A host of new opportunities for chemists and data scientists is envisioned for data science and chemistry to interchange ideas, develop new methods, and address long-standing problems. Chemistry has always been a data-driven science, but recent advances in chemical analysis, synthesis, and modeling are providing a deluge of new data that are multimodal, multi-scale, and heterogeneous. Effective collection, analysis, and interpretation of this data has the potential to catalyze new directions and provide transformative solutions to some of the greatest challenges of the 21st century. In this Innovation Lab, 20 chemists and 20 data science researchers will meet face to face, learn to speak each others languages, and begin collaborative projects on site. A mini-bootcamp will be organized to provide a training ground for participants to familiarize them with chemical and data-science challenges and approaches.

Thursday, October 18, 2018
Categories: Federal Funding
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Ocean acidification may reduce sea scallop fisheries

Ocean acidification may reduce sea scallop fisheries

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

A new model created by scientists at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution projects - under a worst- case scenario - that warming and increasingly acidic waters could reduce the sea scallop population by more than 50% in the next 30 to 80 years. The bright spot? Fisheries management and efforts to reduce CO2 emissions, might slow or even stop that trend for this $500 million fishery.


Thursday, October 4, 2018
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How sensitive are systems in the Chesapeake Bay to acidification and nutrient pollution?

Jeremy Testa, University of Maryland

The wild oyster industry has suffered repeated collapses in the Chesapeake Bay due to overharvesting, disease, and declining environmental conditions. How future conditions will affect the Eastern oyster remain uncertain, not only because these conditions such as increased freshwater are difficult to predict , but also because the interactions between stressors such as ocean acidification, temperature, nutrient runoff and sea level rise could lead to unexpected chemical, biological, and economic change. The changes in stressors and their impacts do not always proceed in a straight line.The potential responses of various life stages of the Eastern oyster to stressors like acidification and eutrophication has received little attention. This project will study the impact of different stressors to Chesapeake Bay, a large estuarine system, and the Eastern oyster. The study will bring together different models to understand the relationship between biogeochemical cycling of carbon, oxygen, and nutrients, oyster growth and survival, and oyster economic profitability in the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. The project will provide insights into future conditions and habitats where aquaculture and wild oyster populations may be most vulnerable to the climate and ocean changes.
Tuesday, October 2, 2018
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