The Olympic Coast as a Sentinel: An Integrated Social-Ecological Regional Vulnerability Assessment to Ocean Acidification

Jan Newton, University of Washington

The Olympic Coast, located in the Pacific Northwest U.S., stands as a region already experiencing effects of ocean acidification (OA). This poses risks to marine resources important to the public, especially local Native American tribes who are rooted in this place and depend on marine treaty-protected resources. This project brings together original social science research, synthesis of existing chemical and biological data from open ocean to intertidal areas, and model projections, to assess current and projected Olympic Coast vulnerabilities associated with OA. This critical research aims to increase the tribes’ ability to prepare for and respond to OA through respective community-driven strategies. By constructing a comprehensive, place-based approach to assess OA vulnerability, decision-makers in the Pacific Northwest will be better able to anticipate, evaluate and manage societal risks and impacts of OA. This collaborative project is developed in partnership with tribal co-investigators and regional resource managers from start to finish and is rooted in a focus on local priorities for social, cultural, and ecological health and adaptive capacity.

Friday, December 22, 2017
Latest Science Updates to the 2012 WA State Blue Ribbon Panel Report

Latest Science Updates to the 2012 WA State Blue Ribbon Panel Report

Marine Resources Advisory Council

The Washington state governor’s appointed board, the Marine Resources Advisory Council, released its first update in five years to the state’s coordinated response to ocean acidification. In the five years since the Blue Ribbon Panel’s report, there have been significant scientific advances and progress made on the 42 recommended actions. The report highlights the new research that justifies more concerted efforts to combat ocean acidification. The report is publicly available [EasyDNNnewsLink|80]. 

Eleven NOAA and Washington Sea Grant scientists from the National Ocean Service, National Marine Fisheries Service and the Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research served on the Blue Ribbon “Refresh” Panel and contributed to the report.

Photo Credit: NW Straits Commission

Wednesday, December 20, 2017
Corals use creative chemical balancing to combat destructive impacts of acidifying oceans

Corals use creative chemical balancing to combat destructive impacts of acidifying oceans

ARC CoE Coral Reef Studies

Some species of coral may be better adapted to respond to ocean acidification, according to research published in [EasyDNNnewsLink|78].

Thursday, December 7, 2017
Categories: OA News

DOI's Newswave highlights collaborative efforts in researching ocean acidification

Department of Interior

Department of Interior's [EasyDNNnewsLink|74] highlights collaborative efforts in researching ocean acidification. The following stories can be found in the quarterly newsletter:

What is Ocean Acidification? -page 24

Coastal Acidification Networks: Regional Partnerships to Prepare the Nation-page 25

Understanding and Communicating Impacts of OA-page 26

Teamwork for Measuring OA-page 27

A link to the newsletter can be found [EasyDNNnewsLink|75]

 

Tuesday, December 5, 2017
Categories: OA News
Oysters on acid: How the ocean's declining pH will change the way we eat

Oysters on acid: How the ocean's declining pH will change the way we eat

The New Food Economy

The ocean is changing faster than it has in the last 66 million years. Now, Oregon oysters are being farmed in Hawaii. That fix won’t work forever. 

A little more than ten years ago, a mysterious epidemic wiped out baby oyster populations. After two years of massive losses and no answers, scientists testing the waters discovered what was really wrong: the ocean water flowing into the hatcheries had changed, and the oysters weren’t able to build their shells. 

Check out the full [EasyDNNnewsLink|77] by H. Claire Brown, The New Food Economy, 28 November 2017.

Saturday, December 2, 2017
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