Harmful algae still around but not producing much toxin

Chinook Observer

A microscopic organism that forced state health officials to close razor clam and Dungeness crab seasons last year is still around at varying levels in seawater along the West Coast, but isn’t producing much domoic acid toxin, federal scientists reported this month after wrapping up a research cruise.

Monday, July 11, 2016
NOAA Funds Seven New Projects to Increase Understanding and Response to Climate Impacts on U.S. Fisheries

NOAA Funds Seven New Projects to Increase Understanding and Response to Climate Impacts on U.S. Fisheries

NOAA

NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology has teamed up with the NOAA Research Climate Program Office to study the impacts of a changing climate on the fish and fisheries of the Northeast Shelf Large Marine Ecosystem. Together, these offices are providing $5.0 million in grant funding over the next three years to support seven new projects.

Tuesday, December 15, 2015
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Our Deadened, Carbon-Soaked Seas

Our Deadened, Carbon-Soaked Seas

Richard W. Spinrad and Ian Boyd

Ocean and coastal waters around the world are beginning to tell a disturbing story. The seas, like a sponge, are absorbing increasing amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, so much so that the chemical balance of our oceans and coastal waters is changing and a growing threat to marine ecosystems. Over the past 200 years, the world’s seas have absorbed more than 150 billion metric tons of carbon from human activities. Currently, that’s a worldwide average of 15 pounds per person a week, enough to fill a coal train long enough to encircle the equator 13 times every year.
Thursday, October 15, 2015
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Waters Vast and Cold: NOAA and Partners Sail to the Gulf of Alaska to Study Ocean Acidification

Waters Vast and Cold: NOAA and Partners Sail to the Gulf of Alaska to Study Ocean Acidification

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

The waters of Alaska are vast, cold and vulnerable to the effects of ocean acidification. Although these effects have been characterized in the Bering, Chukchi and Beaufort Seas, on Monday July 13 NOAA and partners will depart to survey new waters in the Gulf of Alaska. Researchers from NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) and University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) will set sail on the NOAA ship Ronald H. Brown to survey ocean chemistry and its connections to the base of the food web in the Gulf of Alaska. 

“This cruise offers the unique opportunity for data to be collected throughout the Gulf of Alaska,” said Dr. Jessica Cross, chief scientist for this expedition, “This will be the first broad scale, comprehensive survey in this area.”

Monday, July 13, 2015
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The Galápagos Islands: A Glimpse into the Future of Our Oceans

The Galápagos Islands: A Glimpse into the Future of Our Oceans

NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory

A study of Galápagos’ coral reefs provides evidence that reefs exposed to lower pH and higher nutrient levels may be the most affected and least resilient to changes in climate and ocean chemistry.
Thursday, January 22, 2015
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