Workshop Report Defines Agenda for Integrated Research on HABs and Ocean Acidification

National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science

NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Program (OAP) and NCCOS have published the proceedings of the virtual Harmful Algal Blooms and Ocean Acidification Workshop in a NOAA Technical Memorandum (OAR-OAP-3). Over 70 scientists, managers and stakeholders met August 11-13, 2020 to identify needs and priorities to advance research on ocean acidification (OA) and harmful algal blooms (HABs) as co-stressors in coastal ecosystems.
Monday, August 9, 2021
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Forging Connections between Industry and Scientists: The Start of the California Current Acidification Network

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

Over a decade ago, California sea urchin diver Bruce Steele discovered a scientific paper suggesting that sea urchins-the source of his livelihood-were facing a new threat called ocean acidification. At the time, there was very little research or information being shared among the West Coast fishing industry about how this change in ocean chemistry caused by the absorption of carbon dioxide emissions could impact sea urchins or other species.

Steele was hoping that the West Coast states could join together to address the potential impacts from ocean acidification to shellfish and fisheries.
Wednesday, August 4, 2021
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10 years in the making: An inside look at NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Program with Director Libby Jewett

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

Libby Jewett, Ph.D., Director of the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program, provides insight into ocean acidification. Jewett highlights how she became involved in ocean acidification work, how NOAA's Ocean Acidification Program (OAP) started, and how we all can personally contribute to combatting this threat to our ocean.
Monday, June 7, 2021
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Assessing Vulnerability to a Changing Ocean: Investigating impact and option for adaptation

Assessing Vulnerability to a Changing Ocean: Investigating impact and option for adaptation

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

In certain areas of the US, marine resources and the communities that depend on them are particularly vulnerable to the impacts of ocean and coastal acidification along with other ocean changes. The NOAA Ocean Acidification Program recently awarded funding for three regional vulnerability assessment projects in the Chesapeake Bay, Northeast US and US West Coast. The projects bring together oceanographic, fisheries and aquaculture data and social science to assess vulnerability of dependent communities and industries, anticipate challenges they may face, and explore adaptations options.
Monday, December 21, 2020

Land locked to open ocean: Putting a pH sensor in the hands of students?

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

8.1. The current average pH of the ocean after being reduced significantly from decades of rampant carbon dioxide being pumped into the atmosphere, and ultimately, absorbed by our ocean. But how is pH measured? If a citizen scientist wants to see this for themselves, is it possible? Measuring ocean pH typically requires expensive equipment and trained operators. Commonly these instruments, while highly accurate, haven't been available to those outside of the scientific community. Recently, the curious mind and drive of William Pardis, a former student at Flathead Valley Community College, allowed this disconnect to be bridged with the development of the pHyter.
Thursday, October 1, 2020
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