Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemical Oceanography

University of Delaware

The University of Delaware (UD) College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment is seeking applications for a Postdoctoral Research Scientist position in chemical oceanography and metrology. The successful candidate will work on a NOAA funded project to aid in the development of a reference material for ocean pH by establishing traceability of pH indicator dyes to the International System of Units (SI). The scholar will make use of state-of-the-art analytical and experimental facilities at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Candidates must have a PhD in either chemical oceanography, analytical chemistry, or a closely related field. Demonstrated skills with spectrophotometry, potentiometry, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and/or physical chemistry are preferred. The position will be located at the NIST facility in Gaithersburg, MD, but the appointment will be made through the University of Delaware. The postdoc will also attend field test cruises with the UD group. The appointment will be for one year, with continuation pending funding and progress.

Please contact Wei-Jun Cai (wcai@udel.edu) and Regina Easley (regina.easley@nist.gov) for additional information.

Wednesday, April 11, 2018
Old Bay with a new spice: a new buoy helps monitor how carbon dioxide is changing the Chesapeake Bay

Old Bay with a new spice: a new buoy helps monitor how carbon dioxide is changing the Chesapeake Bay

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

A new Ocean Acidification monitoring buoy was deployed on April 5, 2018 in the largest United States estuary, the Chesapeake Bay. This is the first long-term ocean acidification monitoring buoy and it will be deployed at the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay. The buoy will measure carbon parameters in the estuary, which is particularly vulnerable to changes in carbonate chemistry. These changes could impact economically valuable resources for Bay communities, such as oysters. The data from this buoy will supply models with the information needed to recognize potential areas of vulnerability and what future chemical parameters may look like in the bay, while also expanding the National Ocean Acidification Observing Network. It will also help researchers at NOAA PMEL, University of Delaware and University of Maryland differentiate between human-caused and natural variations in carbonate chemistry in the estuary.


Friday, April 6, 2018
Nina Bednarsek Awarded SeaDoc Society Science Prize

Nina Bednarsek Awarded SeaDoc Society Science Prize

NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory

Dr. Nina Bednarsek has been awarded the biennial SeaDoc Society's’ Salish Sea Science Prize for her groundbreaking work on the impacts of ocean acidification on pteropods, planktonic marine snails, as well as enhancing policy and regulatory processes along the US West Coast. Dr. Bednarsek was an NRC postdoctoral research fellow with NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) from 2012 - 2015 where she worked with the Carbon Program. Dr. Bednarsek’s research with PMEL has found that the highest impacts on pteropods from ocean acidification is observed in the Salish Sea. Her results show that live pteropod shells undergo dissolution at aragonite saturation state values <1, which is commonly found in subsurface Salish Sea waters and along the Washington coast during the upwelling season. 

Wednesday, April 4, 2018
NEW online community catalyzing response to #oceanacidification through collaboration and information sharing

NEW online community catalyzing response to #oceanacidification through collaboration and information sharing

Ocean Acidification Information Exchange

 A virtual space to:

Engage with regional and topical teams
Address challenges with others in your field
Share resources and information on ocean acidification
Facilitate interdisciplinary collaboration
Follow the latest conferences, workshop, and webinars

Saturday, March 31, 2018
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Stone Crab Fishery Could be Challenged by Ocean Acidification, Study Suggest

Stone Crab Fishery Could be Challenged by Ocean Acidification, Study Suggest

Mote Marine Laboratory

The first study on Florida stone crabs and ocean acidification was published this month by a Mote Marine Laboratory scientist and offers clues for relieving environmental stress on these tasty and economically valuable crabs.
Saturday, March 31, 2018
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