West Coast Ocean Acidification Cruise 2016 Blog

West Coast Ocean Acidification Cruise 2016 Blog

The 5th research cruise to study Ocean Acidification along the North American West Coast

The fifth West Coast Ocean Acidification cruise in May–June 2016 will be the first coastal cruise to reoccupy study areas extending through the entire California Current System — from Baja California to British Columbia — since the first West Coast Carbon Cruise in 2007.
Wednesday, May 4, 2016
Talking Point: Putting the acid on global effort

Talking Point: Putting the acid on global effort

The Mercury

HUNDREDS of marine scientists from around the world are gathered in Hobart this week for the 4th International Oceans in High-CO2 World Symposium to discuss one of our planet’s most serious yet still vastly understudied threats to the ocean’s health, biodiversity and food security.

Held every four years and now for the first time in the Southern Hemisphere, the focus is on ocean acidification, where the ocean absorbs increasing amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

Monday, May 2, 2016
NOAA awards will help improve projections of acidification impacts in changing coastal waters

NOAA awards will help improve projections of acidification impacts in changing coastal waters

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

Awards of $1.3 million this year, totaling $4.1 million over three years, will focus on understanding the combined effects of ocean acidification, low oxygen and nutrient pollution on economically and ecologically important species in coastal habitats.

It is clear that our ocean is becoming more acidic as a result of carbon dioxide seeping into open ocean surface waters. But closer to shore things become a bit murky, as other factors can also change the chemistry of coastal waters. In these waters which are home to many important marine organisms on which coastal communities rely, scientists will be working to shed light on the potential impacts of acidification and other stresses.

Monday, January 4, 2016
Acid trip: Great Lakes could face similar acidification risk as the seas

Acid trip: Great Lakes could face similar acidification risk as the seas

Brian Bienkowski (The Daily Climate)

As in the oceans, carbon dioxide from the atmosphere could throw off water chemistry in large freshwater bodies like the Great Lakes, putting the food web at risk. But the science remains unsettled and, according to researchers, must be bolstered if we are to understand what increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide means for freshwater.
Wednesday, December 16, 2015
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Waters Vast and Cold: NOAA and Partners Sail to the Gulf of Alaska to Study Ocean Acidification

Waters Vast and Cold: NOAA and Partners Sail to the Gulf of Alaska to Study Ocean Acidification

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

The waters of Alaska are vast, cold and vulnerable to the effects of ocean acidification. Although these effects have been characterized in the Bering, Chukchi and Beaufort Seas, on Monday July 13 NOAA and partners will depart to survey new waters in the Gulf of Alaska. Researchers from NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) and University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) will set sail on the NOAA ship Ronald H. Brown to survey ocean chemistry and its connections to the base of the food web in the Gulf of Alaska. 

“This cruise offers the unique opportunity for data to be collected throughout the Gulf of Alaska,” said Dr. Jessica Cross, chief scientist for this expedition, “This will be the first broad scale, comprehensive survey in this area.”

Monday, July 13, 2015
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